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26 SEPTEMBER 1*69 
40< ■ copy • $S m yaar 
PART ONE 



SPO 



OR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



HE STORZ STATIONS ■ 




t more mileage 
for your money . . 

ILL 'ER UP AT THE STORZ STATIONS 

(each preferred in its market) 




re there 
torz Station^ 
I there's audience 



The 
STORZ 
Stations 

today's Radio 
for today's selling 

Todd Storz, President 
Home Office: Omaha 

WDGY, WHB, KOMA, WQAM 
represented by John Blair & Co. 



' s 



AUTO MAKERS 
GET SET 
FOR A BRAWL 

Small cars vs. big cars 
brawl is on. Ad dol- 
lar spending may open 
way for new air era 

Page 31 



Burnett's new 
contract for 
tv tape buying 

Page 35 

In and out 
on Madison 
Avenue 

Page 40 

Half-hour show 
costs holding 
firm— Tv Basics 

Page 43 



14/ T IV rnnrArAptftrl hu A #4 «t m V 



m y mi net 



Courtesy Nciman~MarcuD Atttoitic Salott, 1'rcnton Cent 



A coiffure for her and her alone . . . this is the 
proud achievement of the creative hair stylist. 
He possesses a "quality touch" which comes 
from dedication and pride. 

It is a like characteristic among today's 
better radio and television stations ... setting 
them apart through dedication to quality! 



Represented by 




The Original Station Representative 




radio & television • dallas 



Serving the greater DALLAS-FORT WORTH market 
BROADCAST SERVICES OF THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS 





Don Juan made things happen in Spain . . . and 



WPEN 



9 



WPEN is the only station in Philadelphia 
broadcasting Signal 95 — on-the-spot tape 
recordings of traffic violators by police 
officers who are wired for sound! The actual 
conversations . .the excuses. .the arguments! 
In Public Interest . . and in Sales . . WPEN 
Makes Things Happen In Philadelphia. 



WPEN 



Represented nationally by GILL — PERNA 

New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Boston, Detroit 

CONSOLIDATED SUN RAY STATIONS 



the 



most; 




To say the least. WBIR-TV 
has THE MOST top-rated 
shows in Knoxville. And 
Man . . . that signal is WAY 
OUT ... it really COMES 
ON ... in those 227, 166 TV 
homes in its coverage area. 
Call your Katz Man . . . 
MAN! 



WBIR-TV 

CHANNEL ~| 

KNOXVILLE-TENN. 



© Vol. 13, No. 39 • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 

SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/ RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Coming: Hell on wheels 

3 1 Dctroil's new small car-big car brawl is going to be a beaut, and they'll 
slug it out with ad dollars. Result may launch a new era for air media 

Burnett simplifies tv tape buying 

35 Leo Burnett's standard provisions contract with Telestudios sets a 
precedent for agency-producer negotiations on video tape commercials 

Tv up 17.3% for first half 1959 

37 Television Bureau of Advertising reports combined spot and network tv 
time investments for first six months of this year at 1624.7 million mark 

Birth pains of a new tv campaign 

38 Here's how Ogilvy, Benson & Mather sweated through brand, copy and 
media research to come up with new $1 million Maxwell House campaign 

In and out on Madison Ave. 

40 With apologies to Robert Benton and Harvey Schmidt, Donahue & Coe's 
Eugene Trivell picks up where they left off, covers the ad field 1 

Merkel finds new quality markets 

42 Meat packer forsakes "snob" appeal for quality line and uses radio to 
reach all economic, age and ethnic groups in New York radio campaign 

No rise in half-hour tv show costs 

43 Rundown of average show costs points up stability of half-hour format 
this season, as compared with bigger, more expensive extravaganzas 



FEATURES 

12 Commercial Commentary 
72 Film-Scope 
24 49th and Madison 
64 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

6 Newsmaker of ihe Week 
64 Picture Wrap-Up 
lO Reps at Work 
88 Seller's Viewpoint 



56 Sponsor Asks 

74 Sponsor Hears 

1 7 Sponsor-Scope 

90 Sponsor Speaks 

28 Spot Buys 

62 Telepulse 

90 Ten-Second Spots 

86 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

71 Washington Week 



Member of Business Publications ItTirl 
Audit of Circulations Inc. * ' " J 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circulation and 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. (49 & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Telephone: MUrray 
Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: SUperior 7-9863. Birmingham 
Office: Town House, Birmingham. Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunsel 
Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore 11, 
Md. Subscfiptions: U. S. S8 a year. Canada & other Western Hemisphere Countries $9 t 
year. Other Foreign countries Sll per year. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A.. Addresi 
all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly 
by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid at Baltimore, Md. 

©1959 Sponsor Publications Inc. 



SPONSOR 



26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



PEOPLE 
work — play — LIVE 

by RADIO! 




WHO Radio Reaches From 18% to 35% of the Total Radio Audience 
in 93 "Iowa Plus" Counties, Sign-On to Sign-Off! 

PINNING or primping, radio entertains 
and informs her — even when she can't 
take her eyes from the job at hand. There's no 
time to interrupt her daily chores for reading 
or viewing. Radio sells more economically, more 
completely, more often. 

WHO is the big-audience radio station in 
Iowa. It is aggressive, alert, alive — and it 
invests tremendous amounts of time, energy 
and money to attract and keep the big audience. 

The 93-county area Pulse Report (Feb.- 
March, 1959) gives WHO Radio from 18% 
to 35% of the total radio listening audience 
— first place in every quarter hour sur- 



veyed — the balance being divided among 
88 other stations! 

You can SELL "Iowa Plus" through WHO 
Radio — where you get the very best pro- 
gramming in the State. Ask your PGW 
Colonel for the details on Iowa's believable, 
big-audience station. 

WHO 

for Iowa PLUS! 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

NBC Affiliate 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 



P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 
Robert H. Hartcr, Sales Manager 

WHO Radio is part of Central Broadcasting Company, 
which also owns and operates 
WHO-TV, Des Moines: WOC-TV, Davenport 

e^Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc., Sational Representatives 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



3 





There's W JJCT in Jacksonville, where many of the most 

interesting figures are displayed off the beaches. Such as WJXT's 
coverage of well over twice the counties in Northeast Florida and 

South Georgia (66 vs 28) . . . such as WJXT's 3 to 1 lead in the 
Nielsen ratings . . . such as WJXT having' all the top 36 night-time 
network shows! Can there be any doubt there's more . . . 
much more to WJXT. 




■WJXT Channel 4, Jacksonville, Florida WTOP Radio Washington, D. C. WTOP-TV Channel 9, Washington, D. C. 



YOU 
KCAN'T 
KCOVER 

TEXAS 

without 

KCEN-TV 





EXCLUSIVE! 

we're the only NBC 
outlet for miles 
around Central Texas! 



Ji 



CHANNEL 



CEN-TV 



TEMPLE - WACO 





BLAIR TELEVISION ASSOCIATES 

National Representatives 



NEWSMAKER 

of the week 



Last week in Chicago the newly formed (last March ) Associ- 
ation of FM Broadcasters met at the Palmer House to draiv up 
battle plans for fin's expansiou iuto n major advertising me- 
dium. With a serious, and practical determination not alivays 
present at FM meetings, the Association chose as its presi- 
dent a 35-year radio veteran with a strong sales background. 

The newsmaker: Fred Rabell, manager and owner, with 
his wife Dorothy Rabell, of radio station KITT, San Diego. 

To an industry long dominated by minority groups with special 
interests in the technical, engineering, or long-haired music aspects of 
fm, Rabell brings an unusually practical and refreshing sales outlook. 

"Fred Rabell," one of his long time friends told SPONSOR, "is an 
extremek savvy businessman who knows how to sell radio." 

Manhattan-born Rabell got into broadcasting in New York in the 
mid-twenties almost by mistake. While working for a Wall Street 
firm, he went on the air as a fledgling "investment counselor." 

His radio broadcasts attracted the attention of the Perry interests 
who offered him a job with their Florida stations. During the 1930's 
Rabell was in charge of Perry operations in Jacksonville, Panama 
City, and Ocala. 

After four years in the Navy, where he served with distinction as 
a commander on carrier duty, Rabell returned to radio as part 
owner of am station WNCA, Asheville. 

In 1947, John Ward Studebaker, then U. S. Commissioner of 
Education who had a San Diego construction permit, asked Rabell I 
to take charge of KSON (am) and KWFM (fm). The stations 
began operation on 1 July 1947 and continued until 1950 when San 
Diego built a freeway through the tower. 

Resuming broadcasts in 1951, the stations were operated as KSON- 
AM and KSDN-FM and programed separately. In 1957, Rabelll 
made a move which characterized his confidence in fm. He sold the 
am station but insisted on retaining ownership of the fm operation 
(changing its call letters to KITT). 

In two years, he has demonstrated his ability to place fm on a 
sound commercial basis, his exact goal for the entire industry. 

Interviewed by SPONSOR, Rabell said, "Fm has come into its own in j 
the past three years. Our group is like a phoenix, rising from the 
flames of past mistakes. We aim to promote fm not as a specialized 
medium, but as a major means of mass communications." 

Most industry observers believe that fm faces a tough battle to 
reach its announced goal of $500 million advertising revenue, but 
agree that Rabell will give fm the leadership it must have. 

The National Association of FM Broadcasters, under Rabell, will 
attempt to channel this interest into sound commercial avenues. As 
one veteran broadcaster told SPONSOR, "The association's most im- 1 
portant function is to define what we're selling — then prove it!" ^ 



SPONSOR 



26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



than any other Savannah medium! 




COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS 

Based upon Official Published Reports-Nielsen Coverage Study No. 2 for 
Savannah, Georgia Radio Stations 



. . .WSAV reaches 25,620 
more radio homes than its 
nearest competitor. 



ASK YOUR EASTMAN MAN TO SHOW YOU 
THE COMPLETE NCS No. 2 REPORT 



It's 




Savannah 


Radio 


Monthly 


Number 


Station : 


Homes: 


Coverage: 


Counties: 


WSAV 


144,050 


79,700 


32 


Station "A" 


45,550 


25,820 


1 


Station "B" 


51,710 


31,650 


5 


Station "C" 


118,430 


44,860 


25 


Station "D" 


45,550 


24,640 


1 


Station "E" 


117,140 


66,050 


24 


Average Daily Circulation (ABC Reports' 




Savannah Newspaper 


Savannah 


Newspaper 


"M"— 53,606 


"E" — 23,977 



in Savannah 



WSAV 



630 kc. 
5,000 watts 
Full Time 

m 





represented by 

eastman 



POWER 



• ..your most 
potent selling wedge! 




-and in the Detroit Area 
you get either or both 
at the Lowest Rates of 
any other Major Station. 




0 ^kxzi 
Jil 



GENERAL OFFICES 

* » GUARDIAN BLDG. • DETROIT 26, MICH. 




/T 
It 



ROBERT E. EASTMAN & CO. J. E. CAMPEAU YOUNG TELEVISION CORP. 
Nail Radio Rep President Noll TV Rep 



SPONSOR 

THE WCCHLV MAGAZINE TV * RAO I O AOVCRTISCRS USE 

Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 



EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 

Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Managing Editor 

Florence B. Hamsher 

Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 

Senior Editors 

Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Smart 

Film Editor 

Heywaid Ehrlich 

Associate Editors 

Pete Rankin 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria F. Pilot 

Contributing Editor 

Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Mouiy Kurtz 

Production Editor 

Lee St. John 

Readers' Service 

Lloyd Kaplan 

Editorial Research 

Barbara Wiggins 
Elaine Mann 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
VP-Eastern Manager 

Bernard Piatt 

Jack Ansell, Sales Development Mgr. 
Robert Brokaw, Eastern Sales 

VP-Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 

Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 

Midwest Manager 

Rov Meachum 

Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Allen M. Greenberg 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Oken, Office Mgr. 
George Becker; Charles Eckert; 
Gilda Gomez 



SPONSOR 



26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



THE DIFFERENCE 
BETWEEN 
GOOD AND GREAT IN 
TWIN CITY 
TELEVISION IS.. 



Unlike the oyster . . . good only in 
months containing an "R," they say . . . 
and great when it contains a pearl, WCCO 
Television is great month after month, 
year after year . . . and the pearl is 
always there. 

This Twin City oyster is credited with an 




JULY '59 Nielsen Total Audience 



average of 25 r ^ more sets in use, 
sign on to sign off, every day of the 
week, than its nearest competitor. 

The difference between good and great in the highly 
competitive, four channel Minneapolis - St. Paul 
market is Channel 4's consistent deliverance of the 
great bulk of audience. 

Represented by Peters, Griffin and Woodward 




SPChNSOU • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 9 




IN EVERY 
QUARTER 

HOUR 
SEGMENT^] 



•"Pulse, Seattle 
May -June 1959 
6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. 



See your Boiling Co. Rep! 




Reps at work 




Howard (Mac) McFadden, NBC Spot Sales, New York, notes that 
more and more major network tv advertisers have beeome eognizant 
of the invaluable support they can reeeive by baeking up their net- 
work tv buys with spot radio. "With the rough competition among 
the three tv networks this fall, a national average rating of 30 should 
be considered good. But, this rela- 
tively good rating may be earned 
by very high ratings in small mar- 
kets where competition exists be- 
tween two or three stations. The 
possibility remains that the ad- 
vertiser may have a low rating 
in a market whieh is of consider- 
ably greater significance to him 
and where competition may eome 
from five or six tv stations." Mae 
points out that even with a rating 
of 30, the advertiser misses seven 
out of 10 homes, leaving a gap that may dilute the total effectiveness 
of the campaign. "The way to span this gap is with spot radio. By 
using spot the advertiser ean pinpoint erucial market areas, insure 
more eouiplete coverage and add additional impaet, whieh mean more 
sales. Spot radio will extend a eampaign in its area and depth." 

Roger LaReau, Edward Petry & Co., Ine., New York, notes that 
every year at this time requests for minute availabilities pour in 
from the ageneies, and stations find the time increasingly diffi- 
cult to clear. "I am convinced that media people could accom- 
plish their elients' sales goals more effectively via the judieious use 

of ehainbreaks, or a combination 
of breaks and minutes. Exeept 
when introducing a new produet, 
advertisers penalize themselves if 
they use only minutes. With few 
exceptions, the most efficient area 
on any tv station is where the 
prime time ehainbreaks and pres- 
tige program adjacencies are 
loeated, and it is here that the 
greatest number of people can be 
readied." Roger feels that reps 
ean provide more information and 
guidanee to reduee the seventh hour seramble after minute availabili- 
ties." Buyers might be happily surprised at the grasp most reps have 
of their markets and the stations. By consulting the rep, media-people 
can save a good deal of time and labor, and I'll wager their spot tv 
schedules will correspondingly turn out to be more sales productive. 




10 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



nnbcr t/i a series . 



> « , Ulll LI 



k ir i 



tiTrl 



IT I 



arter-fects 



PENSACOLA, Florida -Population 194,500 

Office hours : 9 am - 5 pm 

Peak traffic hours : 6 :30 am - 9 am 
3 :30 pm - 6 pin 

Evening stores stay open: Friday 

Peak shopping days : Friday, Saturday 

Paydays : Industry — Wednesdays 
Military — 1st and 15th 

Major industry : Chemstrand — 6,400 employees 

Military: Naval air station — $80,000,000 pay- 
roll; Eglin Air Force — annual pay- 
roll— $50,000,000. 



/ 



WNVY 



Hooper and Pulse rated ~fl 
. . . every time period . . . 
every day . . . every survey 
from 7 am to 12 Midnight. 
Twice ratings of second station. 



fe; 
•3 



TULSA, Oklahoma -Population 378,500 

Office hours: 9 am -5 pm 
Peak traffic hours : 7 am - 9 am 
4 pm - 6 pm 
Evenings stores stay open : Mon., Thurs. 
Paydays: 5th and 20th 

Industry: "Oil capital of the World." Hub of 
nation's pipe, producing and refinery 
network. 

Military : Douglas Aircraft on firm 2-year con- 
tract for B-47 Modification. 7,000 em- 
ployees ; $42,000,000 annual payroll. 



KFMJ 



Tulsa's "Gaslight" station, 
programmed for buying 
adults. Limit of two one-min- 
ute commercials per quarter; 
12:30 to 6 pm Mon. through Fri. 
Regular rates. 



SPARTANBURG, South Carolina- Population 180,500 

WTHE 



Mill shift : 8 am - 4 pm 

Store hours : 9 -.30 am - 6 pm 

Peak traffic hours : 6 :30 am - 8 :30 am 
3 :45 pm - 6 :15 pm 

Peak shopping days : Thurs., Fri., Sat. 

Paydays: Thursday; 1st and 15th 

Primary farm crop : Peaches. Area ships more 
peaches than the "peach 
state" — Georgia. 

Growth : Population up 20% in 5 years. 



Xoiv Pidse-ratcd #1 from 7 
am to 12 Mid. Dominates 
audience with 59 quarter-hour 
"firsts" — compared to 9 
"firsts" for Station "S" . . . 
none for Station "O". 



JACK MAS LA & COMPANY, trtcr 

Jack Mas/a, President 40 East 49 St. Dick Lawrence 

N. Y. C. 17 Director 

Clem O'Neill, Mgr. Midwest PLaza 3-8571 of Programming 



FOR FURTHER FACTS ON THESE AND OTHER MASLA-RE PRESENTED STATIONS, CONTACT 
NEW YORK • CHICAGO • SAN FRANCISCO • KANSAS CITY • ST. LOUIS • LOS ANGELES 

Masla Means Business 



"SUNNY" is the 

S ADULT 
WESTERN 
STATION* 




The Western Coast of Florida, 
that is! If you're shootin' for 
adults in this territory, better 
hire the top gun . . . WSUN! 
"Sunny" is No. 1 in adult lis- 
tenership, per 100 homes, 
throughout the entire 24 hour 
broadcast day! And Pardner, 
WSUN delivers more homes, 
at the lowest cost per home 
of any station in the heart of 
Florida!** 



*Pulse, 6-'59 
**NCS2 




TAMPA - ST. PETERSBURG 



Natl. Rep: VENARD, RINTOUL & McCONNELL 
S.E. Rep: JAMES S. AYERS 



12 




by John E. McMillin 




Commercial 



commentary 



The Sarnoff reply to Harper's 

Did you happen to see the letter from Robert 
Sarnoff of NBC in the September issue of 
Harper's magazine? 

I thought it was bright, clever, amusing, even 
brilliant, but also somewhat disturbing. 

NBC's board chairman was replying to the 
extravagant, and ill-considered proposals of 
John Fischer, Harper's editor, for the creation 
of a super-intellectual National Broadcasting Authority. 

Fischer, you will recall, suggested in the July issue of the magazine 
that the present state of tv programing is so depraved that violent 
measures must he taken. His plan : a channel rental tax on all tv 
(and radio) stations of 10-159t of annual earnings. 

The monies collected (Mr. Fischer, who is certainly not a CPA, 
estimates them at $50 million) would be used to set up a Program- 
ing Authority which would produce a minimum of three hour-long 
puhlic service programs a week and schedule them on all stations 
and networks in prime time. 

According to Harper s, the magazine's offices have been "inun- 
dated" with mail, and "mere than 99 r ( of the writers have expressed 
dissatisfaction with the present state of tv and enthusiasm for the 
present scheme." 

Sarnoff, representing the 1% dissent, makes what Harper's calls 
"not so much a direct comment as an ironic counter-proposal." 

Slapping the other cheek 

Applauding "Mr. Fischer's very earnest and sincere effort to solve 
a problem which has bothered us for many years," Sarnoff with 
obvious tongue-in-cheek suggests that the plan deserves a trial and 
should be tested for size in the magazine field through the creation 
of a National Magazine Authority (NMAl. 

"It is hardly necessary" argues the NBC executive, "to elaborate 
on the imbalance of mass-appeal magazines. In 1958, nearly a third 
of all weekly magazine serials consisted of Westerns — a ratio several 
times greater than the ratio of Westerns to other programs on 
NBC TV. 

"Why should the great mass of American magazine readers — 
those who read Look, Playboy, The Saturday Evening Post, to say 
nothing of more chastized brethren as Confidential — never be exposed 
to Alfred Kazin's analysis of the fiction of the fifties in your Octoher 
issue? 

"Why should a member of the elite who happens to find some 
amusement in Reader's Digest he saddled with the expense and trouble 
of finding - more specialized fare in smaller publications? 

The Sarnoff counterplan : set up an NMA with directors of "im- 
peccable professional competence, high intellectual stature and de- 
tachment." Under their direction, "exemplary articles, fiction, re- 



SPONSOR 



26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



NOT FOR HIRE 

signs are going up 
everywhere for the 




NBC Television Films — A Division of California National Productions, Inc. 



GIANT MARKET 




GIVES YOU ALL THREE . . . 

GREENVILLE 

SPARTANBURG 
ASHEVILLE 

. /•-. with total coverage area 
greater than that of Miami, 
Jacksonville, Birmingham or 
New Orleans 

82-County Data (within the TOO 
UV/M contour) S. M. Survey May 
10, 1959 

POPULATION 2,946,600 

INCOMES $3,584,180,000 

RETAIL SALES . . . $2,387,606,000 
HOUSEHOLDS 751,900 

Represented Nafionally by 
WEED TELEVISION CORP. 



CHANNEL 4 

WFBC-TV 

GREENVILLE, S. C. 

NBC NETWORK 



RADIO AFFILIATE, "THE PIEDMONT GROUP" 
WFBC - GREENVILLE WORD - SPARTANBURG 



14 




Commercial commentary (continued) 



views and verse would be solicited and conceived, assigned and 
written and generously paid for. These would be placed regularly on 
a staggered basis in the commandeered pages of national magazines 
of national circulation." 

"Thus, for example, every other issue of the Indies' Home Journal 
would be required to devote, say, six pages in the front of the maga- 
zine to the kind of worthwhile prose and poetry that ripens almost 
unnoticed in such esoteric periodicals as Hudson Revieiv, Sewanee 
Review, and Commentary. 

"Just consider what a refreshing change of pace, what a stimulus 
to further creativity, this procedure now promises for those literary 
figures who now scorn the mass magazines because they dislike being 
forced to write 'garbage.' " 

Two wrongs and a right 

My first reaction on reading this impudent bit of sardonic chican- 
ery was to shout "touche!" and "that's telling 'em, Bob." 

My second reaction was a more sober "yes . . . but." 

All of us in tv have been angered and disgusted by the holier-than- 
thou attitude which the print media take toward television, and by 
their sanctimoniously screwy proposals for correcting its supposed 
evils. 

Sarnoff's devastating counterplan brilliantly exposes both the 
absurdity of the Fischer ideas and the less than pristine virtues of 
the magazines themselves. 

As a piece of writing calculated to buck up the troops, to bring 
ringing cheers from the broadcasting industry, it could hardly be im- 
proved on. 

But is it good public relations for television? I don't think so. 

In the first place, I don't think it will convince the readers of 
Harper's — at least those who are inundating the magazine with en- 
thusiastic huzzas for Mr. Fischer's brainchild. 

To them, I'm afraid, it will merely seem like an overly clever piece 
of evasion, a shallow sophistry which tries to disclaim the pot's 
blackness by calling the kettle names. And in a sense, of course, it is. 

No matter how low the field of mass magazines has fallen (and 
I think they get cheaper and more insipid every week), you're in 
trouble if you try to justify tv for this reason. You're arguing that 
two wrongs make a right. 

Beyond that, I think that Bob Sarnoff and every other responsible 
tv executive should recognize tv's wholly unique position in the field 
of communications. Tv is no longer the Young Contender. Tv is No. 1. 

The criticisms that are leveled against the medium are, in very 
large measure, a tribute to its awesome power and importance. 

More is expected of television, and I think rightfully so. More 
will he demanded of it, and I believe that the industry must learn how 
to live with this state of affairs realistically, and without resentment. 

The sooner all of us in tv realize that our standards must be 
higher, our programing content more important, our business behav- 
ior more circumspect and our public relations more statesman-like 
than those of any other medium, the sooner we shall solve our prob- 
lems. 

Only when we accept, without pride, without snobbishness, without 
grumbling and without flinching, the fact of our industry's leader- 
ship, will we be able to give back to it the leadership it deserves. ^ 

SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 




MORE 



HOMES 

in the 



WASHINGTON 
MARKET 

than any other 



ADIO 



STATION... 



'IN AN AVERAGE DAY 



9 AM TO 12 NOON 

12 NOON TO 3 PM 3 TO 6 PM 

23,800 25,700 22,800 
DIFFERENT DIFFERENT DIFFERENT 
HOMES HOMES HOMES 

*NSI, May-June 1959, Seattle 



*IN AN AVERAGE WEEK 
(MON.-FRI.) 

9 AM TO 12 NOON 

12 NOON TO 3 PM 3 TO 6 PM 

56.300 61,600 62,700 
DIFFERENT DIFFERENT DIFFERENT 
HOMES HOMES HOMES 



*IN AN AVERAGE MONTH 

(20 MON.-FRI. DAYS) 

9 AM TO 12 NOON 

12 NOON TO 3 PM 3 TO 6 PM 



130,000 139,300 156,500 
DIFFERENT DIFFERENT DIFFERENT 
HOMES HOMES HOMES 



IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST 



NATIONALLY REPRESENTED BY 

SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 




P)eTEHS,(G)R]FF] IS t .(W)QODWABD. inc. 



SEATTLE 
OFFICE 





DETROIT 
OFFICE 




NEW YORK 
OFFICE 



SAN FRANCISCO 
OFFICE 



LOS ANGELES 
OFFICE 



DALLAS 
OFFICE 




JACKSONVILLE 
OFFICE 



ON TAP: the data smart buying demands 




RICHARD QUIGLEY has charge of our St Louis 
office, one of ten offices providing a fast, 
efficient service to Advertising throughout 
the United States, 



A NATIONWIDE ORGANIZATION 



Standing near the center of the 
world's greatest agricultural region, 
Missouri has long been a leader in 
the output of beverages; of shoes and 
leather goods; of feeds, meats and a 
wide range of cereal products. 

Naturally then, the St. Louis area 
includes many of the top agencies 
and advertisers in Spot Television. 
For their media decisions, up-to-the- 
minute data on markets and stations 
are constantly on tap at our St. Louis 
office. 

Blair-TV operates on this basic 
principle: that alert informed repre- 
sentation is a service vital not only 
to stations but also to all Advertis- 



BLAIR-TV 



ing and the businesses dependent on 
it for volume and profit. 

From the first, our list has been 
made up of stations and markets we 
felt in position to serve most effec- 
tively. Today these stations are 
located in 25 of America's major 
markets. Together they cover more 
than 56 percent of its population, 
virtually 60 percent of its buying 
power. 

In its area, each of these stations 
stands as a powerhouse of selling- 
force. To help advertisers and agen- 
cies make most profitable use of that 
force, is the constant objective of our 
entire organization. 



AT THE SERVICE OF ADVERTISING 



WABC-TV-New York 
W-TEN — 

Albany-Schenectady-Troy 
WFBG-TV— Altoona 
WNBF-TV-Binghamton 
WHDH-TV- Boston 

16 



WBKB-Chicago 
WCPO-TV-Cincinnati 
WEWS- Cleveland 
WBNS-TV- Columbus 
KFJZ-TV-Dallas-Ft. Worth 
WXYZ-TV- Detroit 



KFRE-TV— Fresno 
WNHC-TV- 

Hartford-New Haven 
KTTV-Los Angeles 
WMCT— Memphis 
WDSU-TV-New Orleans 



WOW-TV- 

Omaha-Council Bluffs 
WFIL-TV— Philadelphia 
WIIC — Pittsburgh 
KGW-TV- Portland 
WPRO-TV- Providence 

sponsor « 



KGO-TV-San Francisco 
KING-TV— 

Seattle-Tacoma 
KTVI-St. Louis 
WFLA-TV- 

Tampa-St. Petersburg 

26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



26 SEPTEMBER 1959 

Cwyrlght 1»M 
SPONtOR 

PUBLICATIONS INO. 



The current tv sellers' market lias made some stations in key markets extra- 
ehoosey not only of the programs they take but the quality of the spot commercials. 

An agency placing a schedule for a durable item last week got a call from a New Eng- 
land station plus another in the Midwest asking that it mail a sample commercial for 
advance perusal. 

The explanation the agency got was to this effect: We're trying to build a quality 
image for the station, and we think that our concern should extend to the quality of 
the commercials as well as the type of programing. 



As some reps sec it, the boom market for national spot tv has produced another 
gratifying side effect: tv stations have stabilized their selling practices. 

In other words, they're operating more firmly from their ratecards and conjure up fewer 
plans to fit a new competitive situation. 

The reps' devout wish: That this will be followed by a firming up of radio rates. 



It's not often that an agency will ask simultaneously for spot availabilities in 
behalf of two competitive products, but it happened last week out of SSC&B. 

The products: Lipton Tea, newly acquired, and Salada Tea, recently resigned, 
and shifted this week to Doyle Dane Bernbach. 

In some cases the requests for daytime tv minutes were for the same markets. 



CBS TV affiliates have gained the impression from the network that it's sensi- 
tive to the massive program promotion campaign that ABC TV has in store and 
that CBS plans to counter it on still a bigger scale— especially in key Nielsen markets. 

ABC TV is going to run 200 newspaper ads ballyhooing the new season's product 
($250,000 will be spent on the West Coast and $1.25 million elsewhere). 



TvB hopes to use a late morning half-hour on WPIX, New York, to bring ad- 
men up-to-date on what they ought to know about tv. 

The station is contributing the time and TvB is putting up about §2,000 for a set 
and props. 

Tapes will be made available for airing in other key ad agency centers. 



Panning the panners is an old sport on Madison Avenue, but tv admen have a few 
special comments to make about how the critics have received the few network 
wares exposed so far. Thus: 

• No facet of show business — and that includes the film industry in its heyday could 
arrange to put its best foot forward at the start of a season. 

• It's become puerile to fasten the copycat label on similar product, since even 
business is alert to adopting a formula that the public likes. 

• Most of last season's hits and this season's holdovers got unfavorable reviews 
at their inaugurals. 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



17 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



CBS TV is reconciled, that it will have to face up with this problem when it 
meets with its affiliates in Pebbles Beach, Cal., 25 October: 

They're going to complain that they are being deprived of too many nighttime station 
breaks. 

Particular targets: The Perry Mason show on the week that Colgate sponsors it ex- 
clusively and Kevlon's Thursday night series. 

Here they are right up to — if not beyond — the wire, and the tv networks are still 
battling to elear early and late evening time with their affiliates. 

The stations' relations staffs are under orders to keep trying, and the stations themselves 
are faced with pressure from two more sides: 1) syndicators who have regional or 
local prospects, and 2) reps who are urging that the time be retained to take care of the 
continuing demand for minutes. 

An equally intense pressure from which there's also been no letup: ABC TV's vying 
for all the time it can get from stations primarily affiliated with the other networks. 



One measure of how national spot radio billings look for the final quarter of 
1959: A survey of reps by SPONSOR-SCOPE shows that the new business written between 
15 August and 15 September was at least 50% over what it was for the like 1958 period. 

However, this reservation should be made: Aside from Zerex-Zerone, Chevrolet and 
several others, they were market-by-market buys; hence the benefits won't apply to as 
many markets as normally would be expected. 

The agencies so far setting the radio buying pace are BBDO, Esty, JWT (New York), 
and Campbell-Ewald. 

Judging from surveys conducted lately by a couple of New York agencies, radio sta- 
tions have quite a job facing thcin in this respect: Getting over to national advertisers 
that radio station formats have undergone a big change this year. 

The information gathered in the two studies on station programing show, among 
other tilings, that (1) the stereotyped impression that national advertisers have of 
local radio is exaggerated and badly outdated; (2) more and more stations have veered 
away from the "top 40" and adopted smartly balanced music formats; (3) there's 
been a marked move toward frequent public service features and other locally-oriented 
programing. 

Noted a media executive in one of the two agencies involved (his shop bills about $11 
million in air media) : "Formula buying of radio is rapidly dying out. The same thing 
ought to happen to our formula conception of this local medium." 



The Rexall Co. appears to be planning to chaiige the character of its operation! 
so that it not only will be in the exclusively-branded retail field but in a nationally 
competitive position to Whitehall, American Home, Sterling, and others. 

The plan in essence: To put out a line of nationally-advertised proprietary prod- 
ucts other than Rexall brands to give it access to supermarkets and drug stores in general. 

Eventually, Rexall may even compete for the prescription counter business by 
turning out a line of ethical products. 

Parti-Day, which was acquired last week by Turtle Wax, has ambitions of up- 
ping its budget to §1 million for next year and putting the biggest share of it in tv. 

A Chicago observation is that this outlook plus some competitive factors may have induced 
Kcddi-Whip to swing its account to North from D'Arcy, which has handled Parti- 
Day from its ineeptiou. 

(For early history of Parti-Day in tv, see sponsor 1 November 1958 and later issues.) 



18 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 





SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Now that the two networks have gone about as far as they can in disposing of night- 
time odds and ends, ABC TV aiid NBC TV patently are concentrating on bolstering 
their daytime billings for the last 1959 quarter. 

The pressure is understandable: Their overhead is well covered by nighttime sales, so 
every daytime dollar that comes in the rest of the year produces a relatively high 
profit. 

Below are some highlights and sidelights on this intensified daytime competition — with 
what looks like a tinge of a price war in the oiling. 



In an obvious move to meet ABC TV's daytime pricing and competitive pressure, NBC 
TV has put a figure of $1,000 net per quarter-hour on three newly scheduled se- 
ries: The Thin Man, The House on High Street, and Split Personality. 

It's a bargain rate — the quarter-hour price on NBC has ranged from $2,500 to $3,000 
gross — and is only available through 1 January 1960. 

A couple of established soapers, Dr. Malone and From These Roots, also can be had 
now on this network at $200 net per quarter-hour. (It takes about $20,000 to produce 
a half-hour soap strip these days.) 

Note: CBS TV has been letting the younger Linkletler's show go sans talent bill- 
ings for charter buyers. 



NBC TV is offering two special daytime packages for advertisers interested in 
saturation-type dealer support for the coining Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. 
Each package covers a four-week interval. Here are the dimensions: 

• The $250,000 package: four quarter hours, five days a week, 44 commercial min- 
utes spread across 10 different programs, a total of 120 million home commercial im- 
pressions, with an estimated cost-per-thousand-per-commercial-minute of around $2. 

• The $150,000 package: two quarter hours, five days a week, spread over nine dif- 
ferent programs, reaching 28 million homes and adding up to 71 million home com- 
mercial impressions. 

Don't be surprised if Colgate advertising takes another turn on the non-exelu- 
sive programing wheel and adopts the dispersion pattern for its daytime network tv. 

The sharp look that Colgate is giving its exclusive sponsorship of the Payoff and Top 
could easily be a telling clue of things to come — and these things, specifically, is spreading 
daytime participation so that it covers not only five days a week but various times 
of the day and a multiplicity of programs. 

For Colgate it's been a slow recognition of two precepts already accepted by its competi- 
tors: (1) tv, unlike other media, is in a constant state of flux, and (2) because of the size 
of the tv stakes, you have to stay in a fluid buying position. 

ABC TV contends that its device of letting advertisers scatter the three minutes 
of commercial accruing per quarter-hour provides a bigger four-week audience turn- 
over than is obtainable on NBC or CBS. 

As ABC TV has it figured out, a program with an average rating of 3.8 builds up 
to 21.9 over four weeks with a turnover of 5.8 times. 

To demonstrate how this relatively low rating plus the additional spread can deliver a 
greater turnover, ABC eites competitors' daytime programs: 

SHOW AVG. RATING CUMULATIVE RATING AI'DIKNCK TURNOVERS 



Price Is Right (NBC) 7.4 21.2 2.9 times 

Treasure Hunt (NBC) 5.8 17.1 2.9 " 

House Party (CBS) 7.6 23.6 3.1 " 

County Fair (NBC) 5.8 21.7 3.6 " 

SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 19 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



The next breakthrough in the proprietary drug field apparently will consist of 
a series of skin complexion remedies that are not merely treatments but cures. 

Several such products are in the clinical testing stage — two of them getting serious 
scrutiny from one of the soap giants. 

The hottest agency of the week in terms of spot tv activity was Bates, with the 
reps getting availability calls for at least four brands. 

They were: Morton's Frozen Foods, Continental Baking, Blue Bonnet, and 
Fleischmann's Margarine (both of the latter Standard Brands). 

Cunningham & Walsh meantime is looking for daytime and late night min- 
utes in behalf of Jergen's Lotion. 

They're continuing to move 'em from the old ranks at CBS TV — not only 
in programing but in sales, too. 

Latest example: Seasoned in all sides of research and sales, one of the crew dating to 
the '30s — John Karol — has been transferred from radio to CBS TV sales as direc- 
tor of special projeets. 

The prospects of SRA coming through with that long-planned master presen- 
tation on national spot radio aren't too bright: Several rep members appear to prefer 
putting the money for such a project into radio presentations of their own. 

Katz has just put out one called the Nuts and Bolts of Radio; meanwhile Blair, PGW, 
and Adam Young have undertakings on the subject in the works. 

Jt looks like network radio will be the only facet of the air media that will wind 
up 1959 with a dip in billings as compared to the previous year. 

At the rate that sales have been going, the minus margin — one of the network fore- 
casters calculates — will be at least 10%. 

The share of sponsored time the first week in August, as estimated by NBC cor- 
porate planning: ABC Radio, 25%; CBS Radio, 20%; NBC Radio, 52%. 

The deluge of spot radio business out of Detroit this fall has but one handicap for 
a number of stations: So many of the schedules calls for peak traffic hours. 

Fitting in the announcements with ample protection for competing cars may 
cause a lot of straining, though stations, according to their reps, are bound on satisfying 
the needs. 

(See page 31 for Automotive Wrap-up article.) 



The big surprise in resignations of the week — although the principals have 
been in negotiation for some time: Pete Levathes quitting as No. 1 man in Y&R'i 
tv department to head up 20th Century-Fox's worldwide activities. 

The guess on Madison Avenue is that Levathes' vacated berth will go to an outsider. 

Most surprising angle about the event is that it comes within nine months after 
Y&R had resolved a complex tv department situation by the appointment of Levathes. 

Levathes was with the same film eompany for 15 years before coming to Y&R 
in 1952, which a rouple years earlier lost another tv executive, Rod Erickson, to Warner 
Bros. 



For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; 
Spot Buys, page 28; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 64; Washington Week, page 71; sponsor 
Hears, page 74; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 86; and Film-Scope, page 72. 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



IT COMMUNICATES! 



The deft flick of a woven blanket over a smoldering wood-fire once translated wisps of smoke into meaning that produced action. 
Electronic images have replaced the smoke signals of the Mackinaws, but the sense of communication remains. Now, the "flick" 
switches on television sets to the only real communication WOODIanders know — WOOD-TV! It blankets their firesides, weaving 
messages that inspire the buying action of the whole tribe. Got the message? Signal for the Katz brave and give 'im your schedule. 

WOOD-TV is first morning, noon, night, Monday through Sunday November '58 ARB Grand Rapids 
WOOD-AM is first morning, noon, night, Monday through Sunday April '58 Pulse Grand Rapids 




WOOD 



AM 
TV 



WOODIand Center, 



Grand Rapids, Michigan 

WOOD-TV— NBC Basic for Western 
and Central Michigan: Grand Rapids, 
Battle Creek, Kalamazoo, Muskegon 
and Lansing. WOOD-Radio — NBC. 



We are always happy to receive 
letters such as yours which point 
up the WGN, Inc. by-words — 
Quality and Integrity. 

Our strict adherence to the NAB 
Code and our dedication to the 
community which we serve, have 
resulted in ever increasing recogni- 
tion of our policy by agencies, 
advertisers, our audiences — yes, 
even our competitors. 

WGN-TV channel 9 

441 N. Michigan Ave. • Chicago 11, Illinois 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 




broadcast advertisers reports, inc. 

7BO third avenue, new york 17, n.y.. yukon 6-8410 



July 27, 1959 

Mr. Ward L. Quaal, General Manager 
Television Station WGN-TV 
441 N. Michigan Avenue 
Chicago 11, Illinois 

Dear Mr. Quaal: 

Of Che 235 television stations we now monitor, WGN-TV is one of those 
which always gives advertisers a well-scheduled, clean run for their 
money. I suppose no one in the business knows this better than BAR 
since we've been monitoring stations all over the country for almost 
six years . 

Also, as you know, our agency subscribers have used BAR to determine 
"questionable station practices," and it seems to me that their atti- 
tude, if turned around, can be a considerable bonus for those stations 
which are automatically opposed to clipping, product conflicts, over- 
crowding, and all other forms of spot nonsense. 

Right now, with all the publicity that is developing on this, I think 
you ought to do a hard-hitting "look how clean WGN-TV is" promotion. 
It might pull more fall and winter business for you than any other 
campaign theme. 

Almost every station on the air can come up with some kind of rating 
story but few can 'spotlight an operation as clean as yours and this 
is what the agencies will be looking for right now. 



Cordially, 

BROADCAST ADVERTISERS REPORTS, INC. 




Phil Edwards 
Publisher 



PE/lf 



T! 




TRIPLE TREAT 

Do You Want 
AUDIENCE? 

* First in total audience . . . 
HOOPER (Moy-June, 1959) 
PULSE (April-May, 1959) 
NIELSEN (May-June, 1959) 

Do You Want 
ADULTS? 

(MORE ADULT LISTENERS . . . 
Mon.-Fri. 7 AM-5 PM 

NIELSEN (June, 1959) 
(No. 2 Station hos only 51% 
Adult Audience) 

Do You Want 
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INCOME? 

MORE MIDDLE & UPPER 
INCOME AUDIENCE 
•SPECIAL PULSE 
(Apr.-Moy, 1958) 

the PACESETTER 
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MUSIC! 

NEWS! 



National Reps.: 

THE KATZ AGENCY, Inc. 

• New Yark * St. Lauis 

• Chicago * San Francisca 

• Detroit • Los Angeles 

• Atlanta * Dallas 

IN HOUSTON, 
CALL DAVE MORRIS 
JAckson 3-2581 




49th am 
Madison 



Hitched for o long time 

Congratulations on your article 
"Hitch Your Wagon To a Pop Star." 
(Sponsor Backstage, 5 September.) 
We would like two dozen reprints, 
please. 

This is a message we've been 
preaching for years, and, in fact, are . 
currently hassling with Don Page of 
the Los Angeles Times, who claims 
that such-type radio operations are 
"sick radio." 

In addition, we have found it par- 
ticularly gratifying to work with a 
lot of kids, and we're not kidding 
when we say that these young people, 
the future adults of this country, are 
a lot more stable and sound than 
many give them credit for being. 

Yes, these kids can really sell . . . 
and what's more, there are more and 
more of 'em all the time. 

William A. Hoftyzer 
gen. mgr., KUTY 
Palmdale, Cal. 

TlO supporter 

Many thanks for the fine editorial re- 
garding TIO in the 12 September 
issue of SPONSOR and, particularly, for 
the advanced mailing of the editorial 
to all of your subscribers a week 
prior thereto. Your enthusiastic sup- 
port of the project is much appreciated 
by all of us. 

C. Wrede Petersmeyer 

pres. 

Corinthian Broadcasting Corp. 
N.Y.C. 

From neor . . . 

I consider myself very, very fortunate 
indeed in having in my possession the 
SPONSOR Air Media Basics magazine. 

You see, for quite a number of 
years I was in radio management 
here in Fort Wayne and I came with 
this agency, one of the oldest and 
largest in this area, this past Novem- 
ber. I must admit that in all my 
radio years. I never did know ex- 

(Please turn to page 26) 

SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 




K-NUZ 

/ Houston's^ 24-Hour y 
^ — —Music anoOlews A 



channel 




Certy o 



In this busy area . . . 
most television viewers 
watch WBEN-TV 
most of the time 

The domination of WBEN-TV 
of the 14 county Western New 
York and Canadian Niagara 
Peninsula market is attested to 
by all audience studies. 

Which one do you read? Check it 
and see how the quality programming, 
the foremost network shows from CBS, 
plus prestige local programming for 
balanced entertainment for the entire 
family put WBEN-TV on top. Add to this 
the perfect pictures and perfect sound, the 
result of more than a decade of television 
pioneering, and you have the sum total of out- 
standing leadership and audience loyalty, day in day 
out, month after month. 

Consistently, TV viewers of Buffalo, Western New York, nearby 
Pennsylvania and the Canadian Niagara Peninsula vote overwhelm- 
ingly in favor of the entertainment educational, cultural, and 
informative programs . . . presented as a community responsibility 
by WBEN-TV on Channel 4. 

Reason enough that in WBEN-TV land your TV dollars count for 
more on Channel 4. 



\\ > OM I .N d / 1 IVINGSIO.N 

/ D»n,.,lltXj 



A L I. t (., A N ^ 
O Cuba 

Welltv.llt n 



% Homtll ^ 

S I E f B E * 



"f lrad< 





M c K E 


A R R E N 














ELK 



A N 



PtN\MLV\.NH 



P O T 1 E R 
OCoudertpott 



Represented nationally by 

HARRINGTON, R1GHTER and PARSONS 



WBEN-TV 



CBS the nation's top network 
A SERVICE OF THE BUFFALO EVENING NEWS 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



25 




OUI* MUS/G iS THe MOST.' 

Listeners dig our music in much lorger numbers thon thot 
of our "music ond news" competitors. 

WBT's locol music shows enjoy o 98% listener leod in the 
mornings, 50% ofternoons ond 126% ot night.* 

Music represents only o portion of WBT's voried, creotive, 
responsible progromming. At home or on the rood, Coro- 
linions hove it mode with WBT. 

Express yourselves, truth-seekers. A smoll bundle of loot 
ploced on WBT covers the notion's 24th lorgest rodio pod.** 
Coll CBS Rodio Spot Soles for the Word. 

*Pulse 25 county area 1959 (Morch) 
"A. C, Nielsen Co. 

WBT CHapiprre 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY CBS RADIO SPOT SALES 
JEFFERSON STANDARD BROADCASTING COMPANY 



49TH & MADISON 

{Continued from page 24) 

• actly how ratings, share of audiences, 
etc., etc., were actually arrived at. 
Too, I didn't know exactly how tiine- 
buyers REALLY put their knowledge 
to work. 

Truthfully gentlemen, I believe this 
magazine to be the finest, most com- 
prehensive, most interesting of any 
trade publication I have ever run 
across. It will be on my desk at all 
limes! 

Norman C. Widenhofer 
radio-tv head 
Willis S. Martin Co. 
Fort Wayne, Ind. 

* * * 

Air Media Basics is my day-to-day 
right-hand guide. I keep it handy 
for use in presentations, general 
guide and media encyclopedia deluxe. 

It is also a useful tool for training 
new media personnel . . . there is 
not the usual confusion of writing for 
the novices to wade through ... it is 
concise and if they can't comprehend 
this, you might as well give up. In- 
cidentally, the sponsor Basics of two 
years ago where you listed a refresher 
course for "old" tiinebuyers and a 
guide for the new buyers is still kept 
handy for the same purpose. 

Esther N. Anderson 

timebuyer 

MacFarland, Aveyard & Co. 
Chicago 

* * * 

. . . and far 

Your 13th annual edition of Basics 
has reached me today, and I want you 
to know way out here in Hong Kong 
we find your publication invaluable. 
We are something like 10,000 miles 
away from New York and the concise 
method of working up 220 pages of 
. useful air media material is most 
useful to the entire staff. 

Your articles are informative and 
directed in a way that makes them 
most practical and useful. There is a 
wide comparison between the audio 
and tv market in the U.S.A. and Hong 
Kong, and we need the basic material 
of this kind to know what is going 
on at the heart of the industry. We 
congratulate you again on a most 
practical publication. 

Roy G. Dunlop 

controller of programmes 

Redifjusion Ltd. 

Hong Kong 



20 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 




in DETROIT 

YOU KNOW WHERE YOU'RE GOING WITH 

WJBK-TV 



CBS PROGRAMMING • CHANNEL 2 




Sales are UP in booming Detroit 

Dept. Store Sales UP 17.5 f " 

New Car Sales UP 7f5..V« 

Factory Payrolls UP 2(5. 3 p « 

Car and Truck Output UP 6f>.7',' 

And UP is definitely the word for 
WJBK-TV viewers 

June and July ARB ratings 
were both 35.2% of audience. 
August is Up to M.5%—28% higher 
than any other Detroit station. 

the highest CHS station in any 
•J-or-more station market. 1 

You know where your audience 
and sales are going with WJBK-TV — 
They're going UP! 

a STORE R station 




CALL KATZ 

or 

SIORER NAT'l SAIES OFFICES 

G2f> Madison Ave., N.Y. 22 
• 

230 N. Michigan Ave. 
Chicago 1 




SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



27 



LONG ISLAND IS A MAJOR MARKET! 




THE GREATER 

LONG ISLAND MARKET 

(Nassau-Suffolk) 

—SELLS— 
MORE FOOD 
THAN IS EATEN IN 
MILWAUKEE 
AND NEWARK 
PUT TOGETHER! 

FOOD STORE SALES 

$764,361,000 



(Sales Mgt.) 



WHLI 



Dominates the Major Long Island Market 
Delivers MORE Audience than any other 
Network or Independent Station! 

(Pulse) 



►10,000 WATTS 



WHLI 


AM MOO 
f M 913 


HEMPSTEAD 
IONC ISLAND, N. Y. 





Represented by Gill-Perno 



28 



National and regional buys 
in work now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

Colgate-Palmolive Co., New York: Going into about 40 markets 
in October for Fab. Placement is for day and night minutes for 52 
weeks. Buyer: Gordon Dewart. Agency. Ted Bates & Co., New York. 

Charmin Paper Products Co., sub. of P&G, Green Bay, Wis.: 
Kicking off flights in top markets for Charmin Tissue starting this 
month for the P&G contract. Day minutes are being used, fre- 
quencies varying. Buyer: Sam Tarricone. Agency: Benton & Bowles, 
New York. 

Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, Mich.: Schedules get off in October in 
markets throughout the country for its new cars. Length of flights 
and announcements vary from market to market. Head buyer: Allan 
Sacks. Agency: J. Walter Thompson Co., New York. 

Kelvinator Div., American Motors Corp., Detroit: About 70 mar- 
kets are getting schedules this month for its automatic washers. Day 
minutes and chainbreaks are being placed for one week of each 
month for eight months. Buyer: Betty Powell. Agency: Geyer, 
Morey, Madden & Ballard, Inc., New York. 

Colgate-Palmolive Co., New York: Schedules in 60-70 markets 
begin in October for Vel. Flights are for six weeks; day and night 
minutes. Buyer: Inez Aimee. Agency. Norman, Craig & Kummel, 
Inc., New York. 

General Foods Corp., White Plains, N. Y.: Initiating schedules in 
October for Heart of Oats cereal. 20's are being set for six weeks. 
Buyer: Dick Gershon. Agency: Benton & Bowles, New York. 

Socony Mobil Oil Co., New York: Eight-week flight starts in 
October for its gasolines and oils. Prime 20's are being used in 
about 15 markets, frequencies varying. Buyer: Joe Burbeck. Agency: 
Compton Adv., Inc., New York. 

RADIO BUYS 

Ford Motor Co., M-E-L Div., Dearborn: Top markets are being 
lined up for Mercury, to begin 10 October and run through 21 No- 
vember. Traffic hour frequencies vary from market to market. Buy- 
ers: Lou Kennedy and Bob Morton. Agency: Kenyon & Eckhardt, 
New York. 

Miles Laboratories, Inc., Elkhart, Ind. : Beginning a big push in 
radio with traffic hour flights in October for 26 weeks for Alka- 
Seltzer. About 30 top markets are being used, three and four stations 
to a market. Buyer: Bob Jolly. Agency: Wade Advertising, Inc., 
Chicago. 

Grove Laboratories, Inc., St. Louis: Campaign for Minitrub starts 
this month in major markets. Run is for 12 weeks using day min- 
utes. Buyer: Ed Green. Agency: DCSS, New York. 



SPONSOR 



26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



There is no chestnut more overworked than the critical whinny: "Advertising sells people things they don't need!' 
We, as one agency, plead guilty. Advertising docn sell people things they don't need. 
Things like television sets, automobiles, catsup, mattresses, cosmetics, 
ranges, refrigerators, and so on and on. 

People don't really need these things. People don't really need art, music, literature, newspapers, 
historians, wheels, calendars, philosophy, or, for that matter, critics of advertising, either. 

All people really need is a eave, a piece of meat and, possibly, a fire. 

The complex thing we call civilization is made up of luxuries. An eminent philosopher 
of our time has written that great art is superior to lesser art in the degree 
that it is "life-enhancing." Perhaps something of the sume thing can be claimed for the prod- 
ucts that are sold through advertising. 

They enhance life, to whatever degree they can. 

Indeed, that is the purpose of our unique and restless economy. It is fundamentally devoted 
to the production and distribution of things people don't neeil. 

Among them are toothpaste, electricity, outboard motors, artificial satellites and education. 
Without advertising that economy cannot exist .... Young i0 Rubicam, Advertising 



People don't really need art, 




SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



29 



IN MEMPHIS... 
IT'S CHANNEL 3 



/ 



In Survey After Survey— 



Here are the latest Memphis Surveys, showing leads in 
competitively-rated quarter hours, sign-on to sign-off, 
Sunday thru Saturday: 

A.R.B. Pulse Nielsen 

Apr. 17-May 14, 1959 May 1959 July 1959 

(Metro Area) (Metro Area) (Station Area) 

WREC-TV 250 309 276 

Sta. B 80 79 64 

Sta. C 68 7 56 



WREC-TV 

Channel 3 Memphis 



TflfVIMON ^Br 



MEMPHIS 



/ 




If IVM* \ HHWI IWtll in 



I 



A TELEPULSE 
REPORT 




I 



MONTHLY 

TV REPORT 



Nielsen Station Index 



by 

A.R.B. 



At 



by 

Pulse 



4t 



by 

Nielsen 



Represented Nationally by the Katz Agency 



30 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



^ SPONSOR 



26 SEPTEMBER 1959 





V 



NEW SHAPES in cars are bringing new patterns in ad buying, 
as different from the old as Chevy's I960 Corvair vs. 1936 model 



AUTOS AT THE CROSSROADS— PART ONE 



COMING: HELL ON WHEELS 

DETROIT'S NEW SMALL CAR- BIG CAR BRAWL IS GOING TO 
BE A BEAUT, AND THEY'LL SLUG IT OUT WITH AD DOLLARS 



^Springtime in Paris w ould have a hard time match- 
ing the excitement of this autumn in Detroit as the 
Big Three automotives finally turn down a road 
they've been avoiding for a decade — building and 
marketing "compact" cars. Deeply involved in this 
new departure is the broadcast advertising business. 

If the battle for auto sales becomes as heated as 
present signs portend, air media should come close 
to doing a $100 million billing this year on national 
car business, plus a lot more on the regional and 



local level. In succeeding years, as marketing strat- 
egies may be affected by the addition of .-till more 
compact cars, by probable changing patterns of 
manufacturer-dealer relationships, by new ad copy 
approaches, by foreign manufacturers struggling to 
retain or regain the beachheads they've established 
in recent years, investments in tv and radio should 
go on climbing. 

An optimistic picture? It is, and it matches the 
optimism that generally pervades Detroit right now. 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



31 



But the shadow of the question mark 
is ever present over this unwieldy in- 
dustry which, once it thinks it has 
nosed out a trend, takes two )ears to 
meet it, and where no mistake is ever 
a cheap one. 

Here is sponsor's analysis of the 
automotive scene as it will relate to 



air media based on interviews with 
representatives of both industries: 

Imminent threat to Detroit and its 
ad plans is the steel strike. "If it 
lasts another 30 days, we're all in 
trouble," said an automotive man. 
( The strike, longest in steel's history, 
and going into its 68th dav at SPON- 



SOR presstime, has halted about 87% 
of nation's steel production). Even 
when it is settled, it will not mean 
that steel will immediately flood De- 
troit again. And, should winter set in 
before settlement, there will be the 
added delays of frozen ores. 

Orders on spot air campaigns are 



IN A CRUCIAL YEAR, 


DETROIT MOVES INTO 


HEAVIER 


COMPANY 


DIVISIONS 


AGENCY 


INTRO DATE** 




DUICK 


MeC-E. 


2 OCT. 




Cadillac 


MacManus J&A 


1 OCT. 




Chevrolet 


Camp-Ewald 


30 SEPT. 




Cory ai r 


Camp-Ewald 


29 SEPT. 




Oldsmobile 


Brother 


27 SEPT. 




Pontiac 


MacManus J&A 


25 SEPT. 




GM truck & coach 


McC-E. 






' Cnrysler 


Burnett 


13 OCT. 




Valiant 


BBDO 


25 OCT. 




DeSoto 


BBDO 


14 OCT. 


CHRYSLER < 


Dodge 


Grant 


1 OCT. 




Dart 


Grant 


5 OCT. 




Imperial 


Y&R 


29 SEPT. 




Plvmnuth 


Grant 


12 OCT. 



FORD 



Ford 

Falcon 

Thunderbird 

Edsel 

Lincoln 

Mercury 



JWT 
JWT 
JWT 
K&E 
K&E 
K&E 



1 OCT. 

2 SEPT. 

9 OCT. 
11 OCT. 
13 OCT. 



INDIES 



Rambler 
American 
Ambassador 
Studebaker (Lark) 
Willys Jeep Wagon 
Renault* 



Geyer, MM&B 

Geyer, MM&B 

D'Arcy 

D 'Arcy 

Y&R, 

Kudner* 



6 OCT. 

8 OCT. 
13 OCT. 

9 OCT. 



•Renault, a French import (Kudner handles air) takes half-sponsorship of NBC TV's Moon and Sixpence. 



'Intro dates courtesy Automotive Nci 



32 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



carrying 2-1-hour cancellation clauses, dia. "If the strike should go on, let's 
and there have been some discussions hope the auto-makers don't fall into 
alrcad) on network cancellations the trap of pulling out of their cam- 
should the strike cripple Detroit pro- paigns," an adman told sponsor. 
duclion. 'During World War II. when they 
Sueh cancellations in the crucial didn't have any idea when they'd 
introductory season would hurl the ever be back in production again, 
auto makers even more than the inc- they bad the good sense to keep their 



AD INVESTMENTS IN TV/RADIO 

BROADCAST CAR CAMPAIGNS 



CHEVROLET introduces Corvair via Dinah Shore Chevy Show 
(NBC TV), Pat Boone (ABC TV) and more than 1,700 radio 
stations. (CBS, Mutual, Keystone and spot lineup). Bttick 
will use Specs (CBS TV) and Bob Hope (NBC TV). Pontine 
has Star Parade (NBC TV) plus spot tv. Oldsmobile has 
Dennis O'Keefe (CBS TV), Bing Crosby (ABC TV), Lowell 
Thomas (CBS Radio). Cadillac all-radio (ABC neivscasts) 



DeSoto dealers will introduce economy car Valiant via spot tv 
and spot radio. Dodge dealers get new Dart (variation on the 
Plymouth), will use Lawrence Welk on ABC TV and an Oct. 
through Jan. radio campaign on about 200 markets. Plyniotttli 
in a 13-week spot radio campaign plus Steve Allen (NBC TV), 
for 52 weeks. Chrysler and Imperial have no air plans 



FORD has earmarked about $30 million, for net tv alone, about 
half of which goes into Startime specials on NBC TV, (biggest 
single tv investment by an automotive) , the rest to Wagon Train 
and Tennessee Ernie (NBC TV). Ford's new baby Falcon 
shares in this television bonanza. Spot radio at intro time 



RAMBLER, which has made its own air media success story, 
continues its tv spot saturation on some 170 stations Friday 
nights, expects to up Monitor (NBC Radio) weekend partici- 
pations. Two four-week flights (Oct. and Dec.) in spot tv in 88 
markets. Studebaker's Lark and Hank are using about 1.300 
radio stations and Jack Paar (NBC TV) participations 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



names before the public. It paid off 
for )ears after the war was over." 
1 he steel strike conceivably eould 
block the kick-off this fall, but it can 
hardh lose the game. 

The long-range picture is more en- 
couraging. Detroit stands on the 
threshold of a new era. Ahead lies 
a growing appreciation of air media 
— just about as delayed as Detroit's 
appreciation of public demand for 
eeononiv cars. 

"There's a striking parallel in the 
Big Three's decision to coine out with 
economy cars this \ear and its con- 
current decision to invest more mon- 
ey in tv than ever before." a tv execu- 
tive remarked. "In each case, the de- 
cision came about only after every- 
one else did their research and pre- 
testing." American Motors' Rambler, 
Stndebaker-Pakard's Lark and the 
fast-selling imports such as Volks- 
wagen and Renault finally convinced 
Ford, GM and Chrysler that there 
really is a substantial demand for an 
economy car. Admittedly, the Big 
Three did extensive research jobs 
themselves, but nothing happened un- 
til this year, by which lime the small 
ear competition had captured about 
15# of the U.S. auto market. 

"In the same way," the tv execu- 
tive went on. "networks, station rep- 
resentatives, TvB and tv advertisers 
of other products have been furnish- 
ing Detroit for \ears with proof of 
IV s impact. This season they seem 
to have acted, arc putting bigger 
shares of budgets into tv." 

Surprising!), for all their big 
spending up to now in tv, aulomo- 
tives lag far behind many other prod- 
uct categories in percentages of total 
budgets in tv. In 1958, for example, 
their tv spending was about 30'"c of 
total budgets compared with nearly 
00% for soap advertisers, more than 
60^1 for tobaccos. 

But this year, both Iv and radio 
should fare well in the auto adver- 
tising picture. The pattern has been 
emerging all year. This winter, auto 
sponsors will be all over the night 
network tv board: many of their vehi- 
cles will be specials such as Ford's 
Startime series on i\BC TV at an 
estimated SIT million (see adjacent 
chart). Spot tv is getting big pla\ : 



33 



is being used to supplement network 
in most cases, but in some cases is 
on its own. For most of this year, in 
fact, spot tv has been a darling of 
Detroit. In the second quarter, ac- 
cording to TvB, auto billings in spot 
tv quadrupled over the same period 
in 1958 (S-A million vs. under SI mil- 
lion ) . 

Radio is slated for some whopping 
introductory saturation campaigns in- 
volving some 1.700 stations in launch- 
ing Chevrolet and its new Corvair 
and perhaps 1.000 stations (including 
some fm) for Cadillac. What is more 
significant is that radio has been 
getting a lot of stead) business from 



the auto-makers all along. RAB spot 
estimates for the first half of 1959 
showed that three of the top five 
spenders in spot radio were automo- 
tives: Ford in No. 1 spot with S3. 25 
million ; GM as No. 4 spender with 
$2.2 million, and Chrysler Corp. No. 
5 with $2,125 million. On the net- 
work side. ABC. CBS. NBC and Mu- 
tual all have automotive accounts, 
majority with newscasts; Keystone 
Broadcasting went out and pitched 
its own auto study, now claims eight 
national auto accounts. 

After the new models have been 
launched (with especial interest this 
year thanks to Corvair, Falcon and 



Valiant) and the hoopla has died 
down, then what? What of the fu- 
ture? What should broadcast look 
for beyond this season? 

Here are trends SPONSOR uncovered 
— trends which are already develop- 
ing, others still anticipated: 

1, Chang;es in ad budgets: This 
year, Detroit has a chance to break 
with the traditional method of setting 
up ad budgets. Traditional way has 
been to set up an ad budget on the 
basis of car sales in the preceding 
year. With the introduction of the 
compact cars this year, however, new 
ad dollar pools had to be set up based 
not upon last year's sales (for there 
were none) but upon a projection of 
next year's sales. "It could teach 
Detroit a lesson," one adman said to 
SPONSOR. "The sensible approach to 
setting up a budget is to pre-plan for 
next \ ear's market rather than try to 
relate the year before to the year 
ahead. Setting up new dollar pools 
for the small cars could convince 
them of this." 

Cooperative ad plans, which went 
out of existence in the auto field 
about two years ago, have shown some 
signs of resurgence through activities 
of regional dealer associations. Per- 
sons specifically interested in co-op 
plans are quick to point this out. But 
it is highly unlikely that it will ever 
be adopted again — at least not in the 
accepted way. Admittedly, there is 
some co-op money floating about; a 
preferred dealer with a big sales rec- 
ord and an idea on how to build big- 
ger sales frequently can hit the auto 
manufacturer for a partial contribu- 
tion to his local ad campaign. But 
gone forever is the era when a dealer, 
pressed by a friendly local sky-writer, 
can charge Detroit with the bill for a 
flight through the clouds that bears 
no relationship to the national ad 
campaign. 

About the last vestige of co-op is 
the small allowances at "sweep-out" 
time which are given by the manufac- 
turer to the dealer to help clear his 
floor of old models to make way for 
the new. At this point in 1959, such 
monies have already been spent. Sta- 
tions interested in picking up these 
extra dollars again, may have to wait 
until late summer of next year. 
{Please turn to page 55) 



£ "jmmm <' * "•••n • 111 ihmii w iiik emmn < inwv in :ii uiiiii mm .111 iiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiimiMg 




HOW FORD RESEARCHED THE 
MARKET FOR ITS NEW FALCON 

SHOWN ABOVE is Ford's entry into the compact car field 
— the 90 h.p., six-cylinder Falcon. Back in 1954, Ford set 
1 up a team for research — "a bunch of guys under 40 just talk- 
ing cars." In 1956, they became a section called Advance 
Planning. Using research firms around the country, they 
collected replies from thousands who answered questions or 
drove test cars. Most important factor mentioned by testees 
as disposing them to buy small cars was gasoline economy. 
Ninety-eight per cent of those who admittedly were interested 
in small cars mentioned this economy point first. Next came 
lower purchase price. A 1957 test of 2,000 potential car 
owners showed that 12.6% were interested in a car which 
was selling for $200 less than the price of a regular Ford. 

Smmmmmmmummm r lira * wnwiiiiiiwiiu m< * r » \iw « ihhiiiiuiiiiiii 11; niuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiil 



54 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 






SIMPLIFIED contract between agency, producer was product of four-month negotiation between David Dole (left), broadcast 
business v. p. of Leo Burnett, and NTA Telestudios. Above, Dole and Telestudios pres. George Gould watch Kellogg commercial 

Burnett simplifies tv tape buying 



^ Video tape commercials become 'total package' in 
Leo Burnett's new contract form with NTA-Telestudios 

^ Industry's first standard provisions contract for 
video tape makes it as easy to buy as tv film commercials 



jp% milestone has been passed in 
agenc) -producer negotiations on the 
production of video tape commer- 
cials. Leo Burnett agency of Chicago 
has worked up the first standard pro- 
vision production contract for video 
tape commercials. Production work 
for various clients under the new con- 
tract has been under wav with NTA 
Telestudios of New York for several 
weeks. 

Perhaps the most important impli- 
cation of the new contract is this: It 
takes the \ideo tape producer out of 
the facilities business and makes him 
a producer of complete commercials 
packages. 

Hitherto video tape production was 



frequently on a costs-plus basis. Agen- 
cies brought in their own talent and 
directors and paid for whatever stu- 
dio time, scenery and other facilities 
they used. 

Now the video tape producer can 
do what the film producer does. He 
will be responsible for the entire com- 
mercial from start to finish, once the 
scripts, story boards and specifications 
are completed by the agency. 

The fourth paragraph of Leo Bur- 
nett's Videotape Commercial Produc- 
tion standard provisions contract, on 
the subject of "Furnishing Materials 
and Services." begins as follows: 
"Producer shall, as between Producer 
and Agency, supph e\ en thing re- 



quired for the complete production 
and deliver) of the specified Com- 
mercials. This includes, but is not 
limited to, sets, set props, music and 
musical compositions (and arrange- 
ments I. costumes, screening facili- 
ties, artwork, sound effects, sound 
track, editing, video-taping equipment 
and materials, production and direc- 
tion personnel, performers and musi- 
cians. ' 

W ith these words a new era in 
video tapes growth might well be 
said to have begun. The video tape 
commercial ceases to become a sub- 
stitute for a live, facilities-purchased 
commercial, and becomes a complete 
production on its owu. 

Three men responsible for the new 
standard contract are Da\ icl Dole, 
broadcast business ^.p. of Leo Bur- 
nett. George Gould, president of Tele- 
studios. and Alfred Markim, Telestu- 
dios \.p. of operations. Mr. Hole 
said: "Based on the tremendous co- 
operation and excellent results Bur- 
nett has obtained in working with 
Telestudios during the past 15 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



35 



THIS ORDER FORM TAKES GUESS- 
WORK OUT OF TV TAPE SPOTS 



I£0 BUF^r* C^VT, IHC. 
Prudential Plaia 
Chicago 1, Illinois 

Telephone) CEntr»l 6-5959 

Dattt 



Gentlemen: 

Rl: Production end sale of 



Burnett Office 



C ow'lCa) for our climt^ 

(no.) 

,/ s product ...^ 



Icq, the undersigned rrodueer, after cx»«iiwttien c£ script snd otWr 
RSteriai available relating to tho ComracrcUKs) coded as »oecifit4 
herein, sf-rce to produce a* indicated herein, and sell euch Csmwrcialts) 
in accordsnue with tr.a Afrcciwnt entitled "Standard Provisiona", here- 
tofore alfned by you end the Leo Burnett C^ncany, X*W..» which Agnt-mtnt 
is incorporated herein «nd mado a part hcreoft 



1. Cote 


Total Lenpth 
in Seconds 


BW or 
Color 


Does Final 
Sound Track 
Include ^usic? 


Production 
0*tw 
















































< 


























■ 


1 




























, 
















1 









Exceptions cr additions to Standard Provisions are an follewat (if none, 
please so epecify.) 



3. Total t>rice is •< 



Producer soecifically acknowledges tho rirK of Uo Burnett Corcoany, Inc., or 
anyone designated by Loo Bt'rnctt Company, Inc., to crdrr videotape copiea »t 
any time cither thrown Producer or directly froa the tape laboratory utilized 
by Producer, if any, end such laboratory is instructed to accept s copy of 
thia Production Contract se lta authority to act won" such order. 



Accepted end figrccd To 
{r reducer)' 

£c 



Very truly yours, 

LTO BtP"T' CMPA"!, '»C. 



'llllli ) 



rrtm 



THE HEART of the precedental standard provisions 
contract put into effect by Leo Burnett tvith Telestudios is 
this production contract sheet (above), detailing number of 
commercials to be made, client, total price, codes, length, 
production dates and music use. The form also grants the 
agency duplicating rights to copy the video tapes. 

This form folloivs an 11-page, 25-paragraph contract 
which specifies details on quality, approvals in production, 
changes, delivery, talent fees, union codes, storage, warran- 
ties, terminations, publicity, laws and title and assignment. 



months, it was only natural for us to 
think first of Telestudios in entering 
into an agreement such as this." Mr. 
Dole predicted "that this ty; e of ar- 
rangement will eventually be adopted 
as standard operating procedure for 
the industry."' 

George Gould expected that about 
half of Telestudios business in the 
next 12 months would be these "total 
package" commercials. He antici- 
pated $1.5 million in package busi- 
ness and an equal amount of facili- 
ties grosses. 

Although the Leo Burnett contract 
is the first formalization of a stand- 
ard provisions contract, Gould stated 
that Telestudios has been, in effect, 
the packager on commercials made for 
other agencies, including Doyle Dane 
Bernbach, Benton & Bowles, Clinton 
Frank, Knox and Reeves. 

The standard provisions contract, 
which shifts production responsibility 
away from the agency, was in part 
designed expressly to relieve agency- 
men of production chores. In a sense 
it adapts tape production to the pack- 
age specifications of film. In so do- 
ing, it makes video tape comprehensi- 
ble to film commercials men at agen- 
cies. Because of this bridge between 
agencymen of varying background, 
the new contracts will likely have the 
result of encouraging tape use in 
commercials. Not only will contrac- 
tual specifications be clearer and 
easier to work out, but commercials 
men with experience in other areas 
will find it easier now to apply them- 
selves to video tape than they could 
previously. 

The actual contract has 25 sections 
and covers 11 mimeographed pages. 
Additionally, it contains a page for 
production specifications and data 
and another page for a talent report. 
The rights and responsi' ilities of 
both agency and producer are de- 
fined and clarified. 

The producer's responsibilities in- 
clude assumption of all production 
and talent costs, even such details as 
the bookkeeping on withholding 
taxes. 

The agency will handle all per- 
former's use and re-use fees should 
music be changed after the commer- 

(Please turn to page 50) 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



TV BILLINGS CLIMB 
17.3% IN FIRST HALF 
1959 OVER 1958 

^ Television Bureau of Advertising report shows spot 
and net tv time investments hit $624.7 million mark 

^ Of 31 major product classifications, 23 increased 
tv hillings over 1958. Foods spend $346 million 



^^ood and grocery products led the 
spending parade in spot and net tv 
investments during the first half of 
this year — a year that saw tv rack 
up a 17.3% gain in the first half over 
the similar period in 1958. 

The news comes to light this week 
as Television Bureau of Advertising 
releases its figures for the January- 
June period, its second annual tabu- 
lation for a six-month period on com- 
bined network and spot tv time in- 
vestments. 

Total time investments in first six 
months of this year amounted to 
$624,704,000 against $532,486,000 



during the same months in 1958. 

Of the 31 major product classifica- 
tions listed in the report, 23 showed 
increases the first half of this year, 
according to Norman E. Cash, presi- 
dent of TvB. 

Foods, the leading investor, ac- 
counted for $145,938,000, a 22.87, 
increase over last year's first half 
spending of $118,806,000. Biggest 
percentage gainer was ''chemicals in- 
stitutional" which topped its 1958 
spending by 894 r f although the dol- 
lar rise was from only $58,000 to 
$676,000. 

Tobaccos went from $46,191,000 



in Jan.-June 1958 to $53,806,000 in 
the same months this )ear, upping its 
tv spending by 16.5 r J. l'et products 
showed a nice gain (76.8'?) by go- 
ing from $5,910,000 to $7,591,000; 
confections and *oh drinks moved 
from $19,231,000 to $21,105,000 (up 
25.3 f r). Household laundn prod- 
ucts (lipped 3''r from $43,463,000 to 
$42,177,000 hut "cleansers, cleaners, 
polishes & waxes" soared 139. 6T — 
from $15 to $36 million. (The Mr. 
Clean and Lestoil type cleaners moved 
from former to latter category this 
)car; hence the two extremes.) 

TvB commissioned \. C. Rora- 
baugh for the spot tv expenditures 
and Leading National Advertisers- 
Broadcast Advertising Reports for 
network reports. Prior to 1958, net- 
work tabulations were prepared by 
Publishers Information Bureau and 
were not comparable to spot tv classi- 
fications. 

In the TvB report on spot tv spend- 
ing, for 1959 second quarter (which 
came out just ahead of the combined 
net and spot report) the top five com- 
panies were ll) P&G, $11.7 million; 

(2) Adell Chemical Co., $4.5 million; 

(3) Colgate-Palmolive Co., $3.8 mil- 
lion; (4) General Foods, $3.8 mil- 
lion; (5) Lever Bros., $3.2 million. 

The top 100 spenders in spot tv 
are listed on page 60. ^ 



8 OF 10 MAJOR CATEGORIES UP TV SPENDING 

1958 1959 % CHANGE 

/?T7aTn5™7E^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^$3T35«M 

CONFECTIONS & SOFT DRINKS 19,231,000 24,105,000 +25.3 

COSMETICS & TOILETRIES 64,574,000 65,149,000 + 0.9 

DENTAL PRODUCTS 17,126,000 20,297,000 +18.5 

DRUG PRODUCTS 46,215,000 59,492,000 +28.7 

FOOD & GROCERY PRODUCTS 118,806,000 145,938,000 +22.8 

GASOLINE & LUHRICANTS 13,604,000 14,815,000 + 8.9 

HOUSEHOLD CLEANSERS, WAXES 15,035,000 36,022,000 +139.6 

HOUSEHOLD LAUNDRY PRODUCTS 43,463,000 42,177,000 - 3.0 

TOBACCO PRODUCTS & SUPPLIES 46.191.000 53.806.000 +16.5 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



37 




MANY SKULL SESSIONS like this one with (I to r) Plandome Productions' Jim Ellis, OBM a.e. Bill Phillips, senior commercial producer Henry 
Bate, associate copy chief Dave McCall took place before agency found prjpsr bleid of audio-visuals which led to virtually 1 00% tv recommendation 



Birth pains of a new tv campaign 



^ Here's how OBM went to work on a new $1 million 
campaign for its new client, Maxwell House Coffee 

^ Before recommending 100% tv, switch in theme, 
agency sweated out brand, copy and media research 



J his week, General Foods turns on 
the heat under its Maxwell House 
Coffee, adding alternate sponsorship 
of the lane Grey Theatre on CBS TV 
to a 90-market spot campaign that 
has been running for the past month. 

Underlying the campaign (budget- 
ed, by SPONSOR estimate, at about SI 
million) is a copy and strategy switch 



that has been perking ever since last 
February when Ogilvy, Benson & 
Mather inherited the ground coffee 
account from Benton & Bowles. 

Unlike most agency switches, the 
change came at a time when sales 
were up, the brand image was 
healthy, business was good to the last 
drop. Speculation was rife as to 



which medium would get heaviest em- 
phasis from an agency which had 
made its reputation in attention-get- 
ting print ads (even though 65% of 
'its billings is in air media). Medium 
selection was the outgrowth of con- 
sumer and copy testing. 

"Replacing successful copy," says 
associate product manager Nick An- 
derson, "has to be handled cautiously. 
We wanted to have a very positive 
feeling with supporting research be- 
fore putting new advertising on the 
air. 

Consumer research therefore began 
at Ogilvy, Benson & Mather before a 
single line was put on paper, ft was 
divided into two phases: 



38 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



(1) Brand research to find the 
right or selling idea 

(2) Copy testing to find the best 
execution of the selling idea. 

"Research validated the selection 
of the basic selling promise, 'Tastes 
as good as it smells,' " says Dave 
McCall, associate copy chief at OBM. 
"The next step was to develop a com- 
mercial that would focus on just the 
coffee itself." 

"The basic idea was simple," he 
gays. "The format of the commercial 
would be simply to show the ritual of 
coffee being perked, developing from 
that all the emotional and sensory 
responses associated with the perking 
of coffee." (The finished commer- 
cial contains three simple elements: 
percolator, Maxwell House Coffee 
can. cup and saucer.) 

With the selling promise and con- 
cept worked out, the agency began 
Step No. 2 — researching the right 
visual, copy and audio elements need- 
ed to develop this concept. This was 
done prior to exposure of the idea to 
General Foods. 

"First of all," says Henry Bate, 
OBM senior commercial producer, 
"the distinctive feature of a percola- 
tor is the sound. So it became ap- 
parent early that sound would be 
highly important to the commercial." 




PERCOLATOR 

SOUND of perking coffee (produced 
electronically by Plandome Prods.) 
had to be perfected before opening 
frames could concentrate on percolator 



But experiments soon uncovered 
the fact that there is little that is dis- 
tinctive about the sound of a perco- 
lating coffee pot. To solve the prob- 
lem, the agency went to Plandome 
Productions of New York. 

There, Eric Siday, specialist in 
electronic effects, worked out an clec- 
tronicall) controlled, multi-tracked 
musical sound simulating percolating 
coffee. It segued into a musical theme 
for which three instruments were 
used: temple blocks for the perking 
effect, a bass violin and a Spanish 
guitar. 

After the sound had been devel- 
oped, the agenc\ exposed the com- 
mercial concept and sound track to 
the product group at General Foods 
and got agreement on the general 
direction of the commercial. 

After this came more testing. A 
rough cut. consisting of stills semi- 
finished with sound track, was tested 
to make sure the commercial was un- 
derstood and delivered the basic sell- 
ing message. 

"This copy testing bore out previ- 
ous research and judgment," says 
Bill Phillips, account executive at 
OBM. "and we then felt that the pro- 
posed copy could be cleared with 
General Foods' Advertising manage- 
ment for commercial production. 




CUP AND SAUCER 

FOCUS on coffee itself (rather than 
on people drinking it) called for 
emotional response to taste-aroma, 
pitch, emphasis on ritual of pouring 



One important obstacle remained: 
development of the \ isual effect- to 
show the percolating of coffee. \ow 
Bate, working witli TV Graphics, 
plunged into long experimental ses- 
sions testing slow-motion, fast-mo- 
tion, infra-red. high-speed photogra- 
phy — all of which proved impractical. 
Before it could be shot with regular 
photography, a glass dome for the 
percolator had to be hand blown and 
proper formula for the coffee had to 
be found (water, coffee, dye were all 
tested ) . 

Final visual problem was getting 
the coffee to perk in s\nc with the 
music. A mechanical device — similar 
to a bulb pump — solved the problem. 

As soon as the finished commercial 
was turned out, Pete Triolo. OBM 
media supervisor on Maxwell llou-e, 
started his buying. "We bought 
early," says Triolo. "to avoid the fall 
rush for time. We purchased our 
time early in August — 60-second 
fringe time and prime 20's in about 
90 markets cast of the Mississippi, 
where Maxwell House has its strong- 
est brand franchise.' 

Spot frequency varies depending 
on the size of market and local mar- 
keting situation. Package buys are 
utilized in many major markets. In 
I Please turn to page 50) 



ELEMENTS LOOK SIMPLE BUT CAUSED PROBLEMS 




COFFEE CAN 

I'KODL'CT had to appear as alluring 
as other elements, uas shown opened 
and in contact with cup and new 
slogan which replaces "Last Drop" 



fin lira iiMiiniiiiii iiii'iii n mi ii Mm uni'i iiiniiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiraiini iroiuir n imp, ." inniiiii 11 in in in minim iimiiii mi 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



i9 




and (pUTy 



on 

Madison 
Avenue 



With apologies to Robert Benton and Harvey Schmidt, ivho neglected to cover the ad field in their 

highly amusing hook. With an assist from Jim Borden, art director at Donahue & Coe 

By Eugene F. Trivell 

Account executive, Donahue & Coe 



TRAVELING 



M 



laking the 7:43 from New Canaan is OUT. However, 
catching the 6:59 from Easthampton is so far OUT it's 
IN. Playing cards and drinking on commuter trains is 
OUT. Catching up with the "In" basket is OUT. Sleeping 




is IN. Driving to the station in "Billy's" old Chevy was 
IN, but is now OUT. Walking to the station is IN. The 
Herald Tribune is IN. Getting on the front car and being 
first up the ramp at Grand Central is OUT. 12-onion-skin- 
capacity attache cases are OUT — especially if they're black. 

Looking like a square-jawed Steven Rockefeller on a 
motor scooter is OUT. However, Frances Gill models on 
Vespas are IN. Subways are IN. Name dropping on ele- 
vators is OUT — unless the names are George Washington 
Hill, Baron George Wrangell, or Maxwell Sackheim. Going 
on endlessly about being stacked up over London Airport is 
OUT. United Airlines Executive Flight to Chicago is OUT. 
The 20th Century is IN. 



SPORTS 

Going to the stadium during the World Series is OUT. 
Opening day is still IN. The Stadium Club is OUT. Volley 
ball, almost unretrievably OUT, is now IN. Reunions are 
IN. But enjoying them is OUT. The Madison Square 
Garden Club is IN. Tail Gate lunches at football games 
are OUT. Squash was IN but too many table-tennis ad- 
mirers converted. Siamese fighting kites are IN. Water 
skiing is IN — but only backwards and underwater. Golf 
at Greenbrier, Mackinac and Boca Raton is IN, except 
during sales conventions. Hand tennis is IN. Bowling is 
IN — if you score under 110. Billiards is back IN. Back- 
yard swimming pools are OUT. Outdoor cookouts are 
OUT. But camping is IN. Sports cars are IN, but only if 
you have a large family. Indoor tennis is IN. Fencing is 
IN. Skiing is IN, but only in the Andes or with the family. 




CLOTHES 

Being Ivy League is IN. But looking Ivy League is 
OUT. Italian silk suits are OUT. Ankle length socks are 
OUT. . . . But so are garters. Suspenders are IN. Tired 
camels hair coats are OUT. Class rings are OUT. Any- 



40 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



tiling that matches is OUT. Being carefully careless is 
OUT. Neatness is IN. Frayed collars and cuffs that are 
well starched are IIS 1 — especially when sales are down. 
Shoes without shoelaces are OUT. Norwegian underwear 
is IN. Handkerchiefs that peep up squarely over your 



Tip; Nathan's, the Automat and the cafeteria at the Cen- 
tral Park Zoo are IN, because OUT people, trying to be 
IN, never go there. 



MISCELLANEOUS 




Bull pen agencies fronted by cushy ante rooms are OUT. 
Vance Packard is OUT. It's OUT to reminisce about Lord 
& Thomas. Same for the hard-sell 30's. Flopovers are 
back IX. Trips through electrotype plants are OUT. How- 
ever, trips through Christ Cella are IN. Locking up type 
is so far OUT, it's IN. Austrian accents in the Research 
Department are OUT. 




breast pocket are OUT. If the handkerchief has your 
initials on it, you are OUT forever. It's OUT to wear 
jewelry. Having your shoes shined while a group meeting 
is in session is OUT. 

EATING AND DRINKING 

Ordering a dry martini, rare steak, salad and Idaho 
potato is OUT. Steak joints are OUT. Steak is OUT. Gou- 
lash is IN. So is lamb stew. The Forum is OUT. Trader 
Vic's is OUT. In fact, all Polynesian food is OUT. The 
Four Seasons is still IN. An olive in the martini was OUT, 
but so many people who are OUT said "no garbage" that 
the olive is now IN. Three-hour lunches are OUT. So are 
20-minute lunches at the desk. Taking a "pitch" to lunch 



0 

I 
I 




is OUT. But taking a "pitch," checking it, and never men- 
tioning it again, is IN. No-menu restaurants are OUT. 
Men's bars are OUT. The Top of the Sixes was IN during 
its press party, but is now hopelessly OUT. Toots Shor 
and Patricia Murphy are OUT. Going home for a hot 
lunch is IN. A brace of double martinis at lunch and 
allowing the client to pick up the tab is IN-1N, but you 
are OUT-OUT. Unfolding accordion credit cards is OUT. 
A roll of cabbage is IN. 



4 TK&3<B>V 



MEDIA 

Asking for "the ratings" is OUT. Having media sales- 
men cool their heels is OUT. However, parties for media 
salesmen are also OUT. Station owners who are in town 
for only today are OUT. National Geographic is IN. Spe- 
cial issues are OUT. Music and news is OUT. Radio and 
tv "merchandising assistance" is OUT. Going around say- 
ing how much you hate Jack Paar is OUT. Sandwich men 
are so far OUT, they're IN. Requests for "right-hand 
page" are OUT. So is "urgently requested." All media 
requests made by the client's president are IN. But the 
medium is OUT. Convention dailies are OUT. Third Class 
mail is 067'. Publishers who send World Cattleman to 
your home, are OUT. Extensions are IN. Solicitations 
that begin with "I was talking to the client last week and 
— " are OUT. The "second station" is IN. Additional 
extensions are IN. Quad spotting with bells is OUT. In- 
dependent radio stations that send plastic wallets and pads 
"From the desk of — ■" are OUT. Paperweights are OUT. 
A bottle of booze is IN. W ith the exception of the Ed 
Sullivan Show, dog and ponv shows are OUT. Ed Sullivan 
is OUT. 



En. Note: Asking jor reprints, making jax copies and clipping this 
article are OVT. Making carbon copies to circulate among friends 
tries too hard to be I A and is OVT. Making up your own list is /.V 
only as long as you're still making it up. 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



aciiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniw 



iiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiij 



WHY SALES OF QUALITY FOODS ARE INCREASING 




1. MOST FAMILIES SPEND 22-24% of their income 
for food, says U.S. Department of Commerce (in its March 
1959 Survey of Current Business). For the last four years 
the average expenditure has remained constant at 22% 



2. WHEN INCOMES RISE, there's an increase in the 
quality of food bought — not necessarily the quantity. Rise 
in food expenditures is linked to "increasing consumer 
preference for higher quality, more highly processed foods" 



3. THE RISE IN INCOME per family during the past 
year has been boosting the quality of foods consumed even 
by lower income homes. This accounts for the Negro 
audience included in Merkel's expanded radio schedule 



4. THOUSANDS OF FAMILIES this year are enjoying 
higher quality foods for the first time. This is why many 
advertisers, taking a new look at the market for quality 
food products, are rinding some old notions smashed 



aiiiKiBiiiiiiiiiiiiiii jiijl ui ii^iiwiiiiiriiMiiwiwiiwiwiMwwwMwwwwatfii^miw i i - «*:■«■ vtsmmmmmmmmmtwBmmmmmmm t%m* raiiiiniii 



Merkel finds new quality markets 



^ Meat packer forsakes 'snob' appeal for quality line, 
uses radio to reach economic, age and ethnic groups 

^ Tie-ins with other advertisers' schedules doubles 
consumer, trade impact— widens Merkel's audience base 



^The picture and the quotes above 
belie one of the oldest maxims of 
popular economics — that per capita 
expenditures for food are more or 
less inelastic because the human 
stomach will only hold so much. 

Obviously, what the old-timers over- 
looked was that in a high-income 
economy the quality of the purchase 
can be improved. And the way things 
are going today you can't draw much 
of a line between who's in the quality 
market and who isn't. 

Against this background, the Mer- 



kel Meat Co. this week adds a series 
of twenty-five 60-second announce- 
ments weekly, aimed at the Negro 
market, to its metropolitan New York 
radio schedule for its ham, bacon, 
sausage and other pork products. 
"Merkel's approach," says L. H. Hart- 
man Co. account supervisor Herb 
Stiefel, "is not to concentrate wholly 
on the people popularly supposed to 
be able to afford a product which 
costs a few cents more than the aver- 
age, but to appeal to every population 
segment in Merkel's marketing area." 



Specifically, here's how Merkel 
gears its advertising to reach all eco- 
nomic, age and ethnic groups in its 
marketing area of metropolitan New 
York, New Jersey, southern Connecti- 
cut and upper New York State: 

Negro market. Latest addition to 
the Merkel schedule — twenty-five 60- 
second announcements on WLIB — 
grew out of the company's own obser- 
vations of which income groups buy 
in the quality line. In addition to 
its wholesale and route divisions (the 
[Please turn to page 53) 

suiiiniifjinMiinijiiiiuitJTimiutiiFiTiHuuiuujinDUittniiifintRjjiiiii' iMiiHuiiiitiiiiiiiiuinuiiiKS 

WATCH | 
| FOR KNICKERBOCKER | 
| IN NEXT WEEK'S ISSUE j 

inimmi nRinnmwniniiniHiiniiauiiiniinii i uhi mm un rimtnuinuuBii rnnunuuDi 



12 



See also Negro Radio Supplement, this week. 



TV BASICyOCTOBER 

No rise in half-hour tv show costs 



^ However, average prices by program categories on 
network tv shows hour programs higher than last year 



Jf^ rundown of average tv show 
cost? this season points up this fact: 
While the hour shows are more ex- 
pensive and extravagant this year 
than ever before, tv's basic staple — 
the half-hour format — eosts about the 
same as last year. 

Here's how thev compare: 
• Westerns: The 19 half-hour 
shows average $40,000 — the same 
price as 14 last season. Seven one- 
hour shows average $7<S.000. 



• Dramas: Seven half-hours at 
839.000 this season— five at $-11,000 
in The hour average — three 
shows at $125.000 — is higher than 
last year (two at $63.0001 because of 
the expensive Ford hour on iM5C TV. 

• Variety: Four half-hour music 
at $38.000— in '58, four were $36.- 
500: three half-hour comedy at $47,- 
000 — last sear five shows averaged 
$52,500. 

• Mystery: Seven half-hours at 



$38,500 v*. seven at $36,000. Six 
one-honr mysteries average £77.500. 

• Adventure: Fight half-hours at 
$36,000 \s. nine at $31,000. Fi\e 
one-hour sibovvs are $81,000. 

• Situation Comedy: Fifteen at 
$39,000 vs. 1958"s 15 at" $41 ,000. 

• Audience Participation: 
Twelve averaging $28,000 — in : 58, 
1 1 averaged $30,500. 

The.-e prices represent what the ad- 
vertiser busing the complete show 
would pa\. In man} cases, the sale 
of minutes in spot carriers brings the 
total actually invested by sponsors to 
a greater figure. ^ 



1. THIS MONTH IN NETWORK TV 



Network Sales Status Week Ending 26 September 



illll 



ABC 

CBSf 

NBCf 



Daytime 

rainnHiniiniimffniiiti 
SPONSORED HOURS 

13:45 



inn 

t Excluding pre 10 a.m. shows 



26:15 



24 



m 111111!"" 



ABC 
CBS 
NBCf 



t Excluding Jack Paat 



Nighttime 

mMmiraiifMiiifmiiiH 
SPONSORED HOURS 



24:30 
25:45 



25:15 



Specials scheduled during four weeks ending 23 October 



PROGRAM (NETWORK)* 



COST SPONSOR, AGENCY, DATE 



VTST Telephone Ilr. <X) $275,000 I AT&T, C&W-10 9, 10 23 



Milton Berle (X) 

Victor Borge (X) 

Bob Hope (X) 
Jazz Singer (X) 
Show of Month (C) 
Ed Sullivan (C) 



230,000 Zerex, BBDO; Warner- 
Lambert, Bates— 10/11 

275,000 Pontiac, McM, J&A— 
10/16 

320,000 Buick, Mc-E— 10/8 

230,000 Ford, JWT— 10 13 

275,000 DuPont, BBDO— 9, 28 

85,800 Mercury, K&E; Kodak, 
JWT— 9/20 



PROGRAM (NETWORK)* 



COST SPONSOR, AGENCY, DATE 



Small World Review tX) 

What Makes Samnr) linn (X) 

Turn of the Screw fX) 

Wonderful World of 
Entertainment (X) 

World Series Special (X) 

Our American Heritage (X) 



$225,000 AC Spark UMS, C-E— 
9 29 

130.000 P&G, B&B— 9 27, 10 4 

230 000 Ford. JWT— 10 20 

230.000 Ford, JWT— 10 6 

90,000 Prestone, Esty— 9 29 

250,000 Equitable, FC&B— 10 18 



Networks: (A> ABC TV: (C) CBS TV: (X) KBO TV 



SPONSOR 



26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



43 




2. NIGHTTIME 



C O 




P A 



SUNDAY 

ABC CBS 



NBC 



MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



ABC 



Small World 

Olin-Mathteson 
(D'Arcy) 
D-F $38,000 



Meet The Press 

sust 



No net service 



Twentieth 
Century 
Prudential 
<R-McC) 
D-F J35.000 



Saber of London 
Sterling (DFS 
My-F $28,000 



John Daly News 

sust 



D Edwards 

Amer Home 
t Betel) 
XL J9,500tt 



News 
Texaco (C&W) 
N-L *6.500t1 



John Daly News 
tust 



D. Edwards 
Equlteble 
(FC&B) 
elt Am. Home 
(Batesl 
N-L $9,500tt 



News 
Texaco (C&W) 
N-L J6,500tt 



John Daly 
tun 



Colt .45 

Nestle (Mc-E) 
alt 

Derby (Mc-E) 
|\V-F $13,800 



Lassie 
Campbell Soup 
(BBDO) 
A-F $37,000 



Riverboat 

(7-8) 
Corn Prod 
(L&N) 
elt nr. open 
A-F $72,000 



No net service 



No net service 



ABC News 

sust 



D Edwards 
Amer Home 
(repeat feed) 



News 
Texaco 
(repeat feed) 



ABC News 
tust 



(elt «bs 
7:30-8:30) 
Am. Chicle, 
Glldden. Nafl 
Carbon, Gen 
Jlllls, Har. 
Ritchie 
W-F $82,000 



D Edwards 
Equitable 

Am. Home 
(repeat feed) 



News 
Tex e co 
(repeat feed) 



ABC N< 
lust 



Maverick 

(7:30-8:30) 
I Kaiser Co (T&R) 
nraritett (YAR 
I W-F $78,000 



Denis The 
Menace 
Kellogg 
(Burnett) 
Sc-F $36,000 
Ed Sulivan 
(7:30 9) £ 



Riverboat 



Cheyenne 

(7:30-8:30) 
Ralston (Card.) 

Am. Chicle 
(Bates) 
Natl Carb (Esty) 
W-F $82,500 



Name That 
Tune 

Amer Home 
(Betes) 
Q-L $23,000 



Richard 
Diamond 

Pharmaceuticals 
(Perkson) 
alt 

Block (SSCB) 
My-F $30,00( 



Stars in Action 
sust 



Laramie 

(7:30-8:30) 
L&M (Mc-E) 
W-F $65,00( 



Maverick 



Ed Sullivan 

18-9) 
Mercury (K&E) 
alt Kodak (JWT) 
V-L $85,800 



Sunday 
Showcase 

(S-9) 
various sponsors 



Cheyenne 

Johnson & J 
(Y&R) 
Armour (FCB) 
Warner-Lam. 

(Bates) 
P&G (B&B) 



The Texan 

Brown & Wmsn 
(Betes) 
alt 

Pharmaceuticals 

(Parkson) 
W-F $37,000 



Love & Marriage 

Noxzema 
(SSC&B) 
Sc-F $38.00( 



Sugarfoot 

(7:30-8:30) 
Am. Chicle, 
R. J. Reynolds, 
Whitehall, Glld- 
den, Carnation, 
Gen Mills, Net'l 
Carbon. Ludens, 
T>g-n 



Dennis O'Keefe 
Old mobile 
(Brother) 
Sc-F $38,000 



Laramie 

Warner-Lambert 
(Lam & Feasley) 
Ansco (B&B) 
segs open 



Charle 
Weaver's r 
Lobby 

Mogen Dl 
(E. Wei 
Q-L $; 



W-F 



$82,000 



Law Man 

R. J. Reynolds 
(Esty) 
Whitehell 
(Bates) 
W-F $41,000 



Ed Sullivan 



Sunday 
Showcase 



Bourbon St. 
Beat 

(8:30-9:30) 
Lorillard (L&N) 

L-O-F (FSR) 
A-F $80,500 



Father Knows 
Best 

Lever (JWT) alt 

Scott (JWT) 
Sc-F $39,000 



Wells Fargo 

Amer Tobacco 
(SSC&B) 
alt P&G (B&B 
W-F $47,0O( 



Wyatt Earp 
Gen Milla (DFS) 
alt P&G 

(Compton) 
W-F $40,000 



Dobie Cillis 
Plllsbury 
(Burnett) 
elt 

Philip Morris 
(Burnett) 
Sc-F $37.00C 



Fibber McCee 
& Molly 

Singer ( Y&R) 
alt 

Sten Brends 
(JWT) 
Sc-F $38.001 



Ozzie & Hi 
Kodek (Jl 
alt | 
Quaker O 
(JWT) 
Sc-F $^ 



The Rebel 

L&M (DFS) 
alt 

P&G ( Y&R] 
W-F $42,501 



C. E. Theatre 

Gen Electric 
(BBDO) 
Dr-F $51,000 



The Chevy 

Show 
Dinah Shore 

(9-10) 
Chevrolet 
(Cemp-E) 
V-L $165,001 



Bourbon St. 
Beat 

Ven Heusen 
(Grey) 
Reynolds Metal 
(L&N) 
lnt'1 Latex 
(B.-McC) 



Danny Thomas 
Gen Foods 
(B&-B) 
Sc-F $i7.500 
Show of Month 
(8:30-10) # 



Peter Cunn 
Bristol-Myers 
(DCS&S) elt 
R. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 
My-F $38.00( 



The Rifleman 
Miles Lab 
(Wade) 
P&G (B&B) 
Ralston 
(Gerdner) 
W-F $38,000 



Tightrope 

Phermaceullcals 

(Perkson) 
A-F 

My-F $39,0OC 



Arthur Murray 

Lorlllard (L&N) 
elt 

Sterling (DFS) 
V-L $30,001 



Hawaiian 

(9:30-10:! 
Carter (Be 
Whitehe 
I Bates) 
My-F $S 



The Alaskans 

(9:30-10:30) 
L&M (Mc-E) 
Armour (FCB) 
Natl Carb (Esty 
A-F $77,50( 



Hitchcock 
Presents 
Bristol-Myers 
(Y&R) 
My-F $39,000 



The Chevy 
Show 



Adv. In Paradise 

(9:30-10:30) 
L&M (Mc-E) 
Armour (FCB) 
A-F $80,00( 



Ann Southern 
Gen Foods 
(B&B) 
Sc-F $10,000 



Alcoa-Coodyea 

Theater 
Alcoa (FSR) al 
Goodyear (Y&R 
Dr-F $39,001 



Philip Marlowe 
Whitehall 
(Bates) 

Brown & Wmsn 

(Bates) 
My-F $39,000 



Red Skelton 
Pet Milk 
(Gardner) 
S. C. Johnson 
(NL&B) 
CV-L $52,0(X 



Ford Startimc 

(9-10) 
Ford (JWT) 
V-L $200,001 
(average 
• 



Hawaiian 

Am. Chi. 

(Bates) 
Har Rltci 

(K&E) 



The Alaskans 

Johnson & J 
(Y&R) 
DuPont (BBDO 



Benny alt 
Cobel 

Lever (JWT) 
VC-L $47,000 



Loretta Young 

Tonl (North) 
elt Philip Mor- 
ris (Burnett) 
Dr-F $42,501 



Adv. In Paradise 

Reynolds Metal! 

(L&N) 
Anahist (Bates) 

J&J (Y&R) 
Polaroid (DDE) 



Hennessey 
Lorlllard (L&N) 
alt 

Gen Foods 
(Y&R) 
W-F $39,000 



Steve Allen 
(10-11) 
Plymouth 
(Ayer) 
CV-L $125,001 



Alcoa Presents 

Alcoa (FSR) 
Dr-F $35,000 



Garry Moore 

(10-11) 
Kellogg 
(Burnett) 
P-P-G (Mason) 
CV-L $109,001 



Ford Startime 
World Series 

Special 
(9:30-10:30) 0 



Wed Ni| 
Fights 
Brown & V 
(Bates) 
Miles (Wi 
(10-conc 
Sp-L $3 



World of Talen 

P. Lorlllard 
(L&N) 
MuV-L $16.00' 



What's My Line 
Kellogg 
(Burnetii 
alt Sunbeam 
(Perrln-Paus) 
Q-L $32,000 



No net service 



Man With 
A Camera 

G.E. (Grey) 
A-F $31,000 



June Allyson 

DuPont (BRDO) 
Dr-F $41,000 



Steve Allen 



Keep Talking 
Mutual of Omaha 

(Bozell & J) 
Q-L $18,000 



Garry Moore 

Polaroid (DDB) 
S. C. Johnson 
(NL&B) 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



10:00 



10:30 



0 Nuclals. see page 43. 

•Color show, ttCoat U per segment. Prices do not include sustaining, par- 
ticipating »r co-op programs. Costs refer to average show costs including 
talent and production. They are gross (include 15% agency commission). 



They do not include commercials or time charges. This chart covers period 
26 Sept. -23 Oct. Progam types are indicated as follows: (A) Adventure, 
(Au) Audience Participation. (C) Comedy, (D) Documentary, (Dr) 



44 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



FfV G R A P H 26 SEPT. - 23 OCT. 



•DNESDAY 

ah :bs NBC 


THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


FRIDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 












|ohn Daly News 
sust 


































— dwards 
M) r (Batea) 
wt :em Band 
impton) 
$9,500tt 


News 
Teiaco (C&W) 
«-L $6,500tt 


lohn Daly News 
sust 


D Edwards 
Whitehall 
(Batei) 

S-h $9.500tt : 


News 
reiaco (C&W) 
:-L $S.500tt 


D Edwards 
Parliament 
(B&B) 
alt sust 
N-L $9,500tt 


News 
Teiaco (C&W) 
f-L $6,500tt 


et service 






No net service 






No net service 


No net service 








1 Idwards 
M 'irter 
n Rand 
cat feed) 


News 
Texaco 
(repeat feed) 


ABC News 
■utt 


D Edwards 
Whit hall 
(repeat feed) 


News 

Teiaco 
(repeat feed) 


ABC News 
■ust 


D Edwards 
Parliament 

alt sust 
(repeat feed) 


News 
Texaco 
(repeat feed) 


Line-Up 

30-8 :30) 
er Paul 
DFS) 
(OB&M) 
$80,000 


Wagon Train 

(7:30-8:30) 
Ford (JWT) 
National Biscuit 

(Mc-E) 
V-F $78,000 


Cale Storm 

Warner- Lamhert 

I 11 III & Ji ] 

alt open 
■ic- F $30,000 


To Tell The 
Truth 

Carter (Bates) 
alt 
Tonl 
1 L $22,000 

< 


Tales of The 
Plainsman 

Ansco (B&B) 
enault (Kudner) 
Sunshine Bis. 

(C&W) 
V-F $30,000 


Walt Disney 
Presents 

(7:31) S-.30) 
Mars I Knox R) 

Kill (Aver) 
X I. $94,000 


Rawhide 

(7:30-8:30) 
Lever (JWT) 
Parliament 
(B&B) 
W-F SSO.OOO 


People Are 
Funny 

Greyhound 
(Grey) 
l-P $21,000 


Dick Clark 

Show 
Beech-Nut 
Life Savers 
(T&R) 
Mu-L $14,500 


Perry Mason 

(7:30-8:30) 
Colgate (Bates) 
Parliament 

(B&B) 

My-F $80,000 


Bonanza 

(7:30 8:30) 
L&.M (Mc-E) 
RCA (K&E) 
W-F $78,000 


V Line-Up 
si ittan Shirt 
Sh lei & C) 
1 lnz Glass 
f< Ayer) 


Wagon Train 
R. J. Reynold! 
(Esty) 
(alt % hr.) 


Donna Reed 

Campbell 
(BBDO) 
alt 

Johnson & J 
(Y&R) 
^c-F $38,000 


Betty Hutton 

sust - 


Sat Masterson 
>c3lt?st ( Aycr ) 
V-F $38,000 
Bob Hope 
(8-9) # 


Walt Disney 
Presents 

Canada Dry 
(Matties) 
Derby (Mc-E) 


Rawhide 
Lever (JWT) 
Peter Paul 
(DFS) 
Preaiu (B&B) 


Trouble 

Shooters 
Philip Morris 

(Burnett 1 
> F $39,500 


John Cunther's 
High Road 

Ralston fC.B&B) 
Itr F $31,000 


Perry Mason 
Sterling (DFS) 
Gulf (T&R) 
Hamm (C-M) 


Bonanza 
sees open 


j 

nto Space 
Tobacco 
I iBDO) 
I $38,000 
1 


Price Is Right 
Levar (JWT) 
alt Speldel 
(NC&K) 
J-L $21,500 


The Real 
McCoys 
P&O (Compton) 

3c-F $39,000 


J 

johnny Ringo 

sust 


ohnny Staccato 
Rrls.-Myera 

(DCSS) 
alt 

B. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 
.-F $37,000 


Man From 
Blackhawk 

Miles (Wade) 

11. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 
W-F $38,000 


Hotel D'Paree 
Kellogg 
(Burnett) 
alt 

L&M (Mc-E) 
W F $43,000 


Specials 

(8 3« 9 :3fl) 
fa riou s sp&Ti sors 

• 


Leave It To 
Beaver 

RaMon (GB&B) 
Anahlst (Rates) 

1 '3 open 
Sc-F $30 00 


Wanted Dead 

or Alive 
Iti n & %VrnioD 

(Bates) 
Kimlierly- Clark 

U-'C&B) 
(V-F $39,000 


vlan O Challenge 
R J. Reynold! 

(F«ty) alt 
Chemstrand 
(DDR) 
\ F $36,000 


* 

Millionaire 
8 te (Rates) 

$42,000 

1 


Perry Como 
19 10) 
Kraft 
(JWT) 
luV-L $125,000 


Pat Boone 
Chevrolet 
(Camp-E) 
MuV L $61,000 


Zane Crey 
S. C. Johnson 

(NL&B) alt 
General Foodi 

(B&B) 
V-F $45,000 

< 


achelor Father 
Whitehall 
(Bates) 
alt 

.m Tob (Gumb.) 
cF $42,000 


'7 Sunset Strip 

(0-10) 
Am Chicle 
(Hates) 
Whitehall 
(Hates) 
My-F $85,000 


Desilu 
Playhouse 

!9-10> 
Westlnehouse 
(Mc E) 
Di-L $90,000 


Specials 


Lawrence Welk 

(9-10) 
Dodge (Grant) 
Mat, $21,500 


Brenner 
Lever (JWTj 
\ F $38,000 


The Deputy 

Kelli>cg(Bumettl 
W-F $39,000 


e Cot a 

alda (Eatv) 

$27,000 


Perry Como 


Untouchables 

(9:30 10:30) 
L&M (Mr E) 
Armour (FCB) 
My-F $80,000 


Playhouse 90 
(9:30-11) 
Amer Oaa 1 
(L&N) 
ir UP $110,000 
(90 min.) 


rnie Ford Show 
Ford (JWT) 
;v-l $42,000 


77 Sunset Strip 

H Ritchie 
(JC&E) 
R. J Reynolds 

(Esty) 
Carter (Bates) 


Desilu 
Playhouse 


M Squad 

l in Tob (SSCB) 
alt 

Sterling (DFS) 
k F $31,000 


Lawrence Welk 


Have Cun. Will 
Travel 
Whitehall 
(Bates) 
alt Lever (JWT) 
A'F $10,000 


Five Fingers 

(9:30-10:30) 

Midas, Sterling, 

Corning Glass 
My V S6O.00O 


Steel Hr 

nkl 1011) 
S. Steel 
BBDO) 

$80,000 


This Is Your 

Life 
P&O (B*B) 

L $52,000 


Untouchables 

Lewis Howa 
(Mc E) 
Carnation 
(EWRR) 
Inahlst (Bates) 


Playhouse 90 
Allstate 
(Burnett) 
alt 

temolds (Esty) , 


You Bet Your 

Life 
Pharmaceuticals 
(Parkson) alt 
Lever (BRDO) 
!-L $53,000 


Robert Taylor's 
Cap't of 
Detectives 

X>*(5 
(Ii&T!) 
My-F $15,001) 


Twilight Zone 

Gen Fond3 
(Y&B) 
alt 

Kimberly Clark 

(1-'CR> 
A F $30,000 


Cavalcade of 

Sports 
llllette (Maxon) 
(10-concl) 

•pi* $55,000 

Victor Borge 

(10 11) <§ 


Jubilee. U S.A. 
(10 11) 

Massey- Ferguson 

(NX&B) 
Mu-L $20,000 


Cunsmoke 
UM (DFS) alt 
Sperry-Rand 
(Y&R) 

IV F $42,000 


Five Fingers 
PuIW. I'tSiG, 
Hi-lpne Curtis. 
Hrls-Myers 
$egs open 


le Theatre 
»ks 10-11) 
rmstrong 
BBDO) 

$SO.0OO 


Wichita Town 

v&c. (li&Ii) 
V-F $38,000 


Take A Cood 
Look 

Consolidate 
Clears 
(EWRlt) 
alt open 
r)-L $30,000 


Rcvlon Party 
0:30-11 alt uks) 1 
Revlon (W&L) 
>r-L $175,000 


Masquerade 
Party 
flrlllard (LAN) 
alt Block Drue 

(Grey) 
|L $18,000 


Black Saddle 

L&M (Mc-E) 
alt 

Alberto Culver 
( Wade) 
W-F $38,000 


Person to Person 
Phnrmaceullcala 

(Parkson) 
l-L $40,000 


ackpot Bowling 
Itayuk (Werman 

& Siherr) 
ip-L $3,000 


lubilcc, U.SA 
Winson Dickie 

(FfiR) 
Nul'I Carhrwi 

(Esty) 
l'olk Miller 
i.Vyer) 


Markham 
Sctillti (JWT) 
>fy-F $39,000 


It Could Be 
You 

1 1 1 ar m i mi U cs Is 

(Parkson) 
:) L $32,000 



Drama. (F) Film, (I) Interview, (J) Juvenile, (L) Live, (11) Misc. L preceding date means last date on air. S following date means starting 
(Mu) Music. (My) Mystery, (N) News, (Q) Quiz-Panel, (Se) Sitnation date for new show or sponsor in time slot. 
Comedy, (Sp) Sports, (V) Variety, (W) 'Western. tNo charge for repeats. 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



45 



/ Our % 
2 thirteen 1 
| easiest £ 



\ years jo 

^6 t 9S5X 



Every day of every year is easy when you love your job. Since 
November 1946, turning out SPONSOR has been a fascinating, 
exhilarating, challenging, and rewarding experience. As we near 
the close of our first thirteen years, we see ahead an opportu- 
nity for trade paper service far greater than ever before. In 
our first thirteen years, SPONSOR has been dedicated to bring- 
ing advertisers and agencies an appreciation of radio and tv 
I based on analysis and interpretation of their values. That our 
readers like our kind of trade paper is underscored by the fol- 
lowing: (1) In 1959, SPONSOR enjoys the highest percentage of 
agency/advertiser circulation in its field, with six out of ten 
copies going to the men who foot the bills. (2) SPONSOR tops 
its field by a wide margin, according to all independent surveys 
of agency/advertiser reading preferences made since early 
1958. (3) SPONSOR tools-for-advertisers (such as Radio Basics, 
Tv Basics, Five-City Directory, Negro issue, Farm issue) have 
achieved exceptional acceptance. (4) SPONSOR'S prestige is at 
an all-time high. Its fighting crusades for industry improve- 
ments, its busy Readers 7 Service, the heavy publicity it receives 
in the daily newspapers, its ready welcome by the key men in 
agency/advertiser offices, indicate how vital a force SPONSOR 
has become in the daily life of our industry. First a monthly, 
then a bi-weekly, now a weekly, SPONSOR is geared for USE. 




DAYTIME 



C O 




P A I 



10:00 
10:15 
10:30 
10:45 
11:00 
11:15 
11:30 
11:45 



12:15 
12:30 
12:45 



SUNDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Lamp Unto M 
Feet 
suit 



Look Up & Liv 

sust 



Eye On 
New York 
suit 



Camera Thre« 
suit 



ABC 



MONDAY 

CBS NBC 



On The Co 

sust 



December Brid 

sust 



I Love Lucy 

Menthol alt 
sust 
Lever 
alt sust 



Top Dollar 

sust 



Dough Re Mi 

sust 



Treasure Hunt 

Ponds alt 
Kleinert 



PAG alt 



Price Is Right 
Lertr 

alt Ponds 
Sterling 
alt Whitehall 



Concentration 

Culver alt 
Lever 
Ponds alt Lever 



TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



On The Co 

Bust 



December Bride 

sust 



I Love Lucy 

Lever alt sust 

sust 

alt U. S. Steel 



Top Dollar 
Colgate 

Tick alt sust 



Dough Re Mi 

sust 



Treasure Hunt 

Culver alt 
Gold Seal 
Frlgldalre lit 

sust 



Price Is Right 
Lever alt 

Nabisco 



Stand Brands 



Concentration 
Frlgldalro 
Lerer alt 
Alberto Culver 



The Last Word 1 

sust 



Restless Cun 

sust 



Love of Life 
tuit 

Amor Home Pro I 

alt Nabisco 



Tie Tac Dough 

Ponds alt Miles 



Restless Cun 

sust 



Love of Life 
sust alt 
Gen Mills 



Tic Tac Dough 
S tand Brand s 

P&G alt 
Gold Seal 



Restlesff 
susff 



Johns Hopkins 
File 7 
sust 



Face The Natioi 
sust 



Love That Bob 

aust 



Search for 
Tomorrow 
PAG 



Cuiding Light 
PAG 



It Could Be You 
Whitehall 
ait Ben Gay 
Ponds alt PAG 



Love That Bob 
sust 



3ujh. Ii f u r 
Tomorrow 

pao 



Cuiding Light 
PAG 



It Could Be 

You 
Al. Culver alt 
Miles 
Armour alt PAG 



Love Th| 
sust) 



College News 

Conference 
auit 



Music Bingo 
sust 



No net service 



News 
(1:S5-1:S») 
fust 



No net service 



Music Bingo 
sust 



No net service 



News 
(1:»-1:M> suit 



No net service 



Music lj 

lUltg 



Frontiers of 
Faith 

sust 



World Turns 
PAG 

sust alt 
Camatlen 



No net service 



World Turns 
PAG 

Sterling alt 
Menthol 



No net service 



Professional 

Football 
various time* 
various sponsor* 



NBA Pro 
Basketball 

Anheuser-Busch 
V* regional 
(10/11 S) 



Day In Court 

Johnson A 
Johnson 



For Better Or 
For Worse 

sust 



Queen for a 
Day 
sust 



Day In Court 
G<*neral Poods 



For Better Or 
For Worse 

sust 



Vick alt sust 



Queen for a 
Day 
sust 

Alberto Culver 



Day In J 

Beech-f 



Cale Storm 

Toni 
Armour 
Beech-Nut 



Ar t Linklett er 
sust alt 
Van Camp 



The Thin Man 

sust 



Cale Storm 
Show 

Block Drue 
Amer Home 



Art Linkletter 
Swift 
alt Tonl 



Kelloff 



The Thin Man 

sust 



Cale Stj 
Beech-I 
Ex La 



Open Hearing 
sust 



Beat The Clock 

Lever 
Block Druf 



Big Payoff 
Collate 



Young 
Dr. Malone 

sust 



Beat The Clock 
General Foods 
Tonl 



Big Payoff 
General Foods 
ait sust 



Young 
Dr. Malone 

sust 



Beat The 1 

Johnson 
Johns o[ 
Beech-> 



Who You Trust? 

Armour 
Johnson A 
Johnson 



Verdict Is You 

sust 



Amer Home 
alt Lever 



From These 
Roots 

sust 

fust 



Who Do You 
Trust? 

General Foods 
Amer Home 
Ei-Lai 



Verdict Is Yourj 
Gen Mills 

alt Lever 



Scott alt Toni 



From These 
Roots 

sust 



Who Do 
Trust! 
Amsm 

Beech-K 



American 
Bandstand 

Clalrol, 
Beech-Nut 



Brighter Day 
PAG 



Secret Storm 
Amer Home Proc 



The House on 
High Street 
Sterling 

sust 



American 
Bandstand 
. Lever 
General Mull 



Brighter Day 
PAG 



Secret Storm 
Gen Ml Us 

alt Scott 



The House on 
High Street 
sust 



Amerie 
Bandsta 

Armou 



American 
Bandstand 
Norfham -Warren 
HIS Sportswear 



Edge of Night 
PAO 



Split Personality 
sust 
Sterlinf 
alt Lever 



American 
Bandstand 

Carter 
Welch 



Edge ef Night 
PAG 



Sterling 

alt Vlck 



Split Personality 
Borden alt sust 
sust alt 
Lever 



Amerie 
Bandsta 

DuPon 



Paul Wjnchell 

Hartz Mountain 



The Last Wort 

sust 



World Series 
of Coif 

Bayuk alt 
Am. Safety Itazoi 
(10/18 S) 



American 
Bandstand 
co-op 



American 
Bandstand 
co-op 



Amerie 
Bandsta 
eo-op 



Lone Ranger 
Qen Mills 
Frltof Co. 



College Bowl 

Gen. Electric 



Rin Tin Tin 

Gen Mills 



Rin Tin Tin 

Gen Mills 



My Frie 
Flicka 
am Ml 



NOTE: On ABC TV, Day In Court, Cale Storm, Beat the Clock. Who Do You Truitt, and American Bandetand do not show day of participations, 

HOW TO USE SPONSOR'S The network schedule on this and preceding pages (44, 45) 

MPTU/nDlf TVTI rwiCIAM includes regularly scheduled programing 26 Sept. to 

nciWUKIV I bLtVldlUN 23 Qct; inclusive (with possi bl e exception of changes 

CO IVI PARAGRAPH made by the networks after presstime). Irregularly sched- 



I 



GRAPH 26 SEPT. - 23 OCT, 



* DNESDAY 



IS 



NBC 



THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



ABC 



FRIDAY 

CBS 



NBC 



SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



fie Co 



Dough Re Mi 
suit 



On The Co 

sust 



Dough Re Mi 

Congoleum 



On The Co 

sust 



Dough Re Mi 
■ust 



leckle 0 Jeckle 

sust 



Howdy Doodv 

ust alt Nabisco 

Continental 
Baking 



r Bride 



Treasure Hunt 

Miles alt sust 



Corn Prod. 
Gen Mills 



December Brid 

sust 



Treasure Hunt 

Nabisco 
alt Frlgida lre 
P&O 
alt Heinz 



December Bride 



Treasure Hunt 

Supp Hose alt 

sust 
Whitehall alt 
Sterling 



Mighty Mouse 

Gen Foods 

alt sust 
Colgate alt 
Gen Foods 



Ruff 0 Reddy 

ltordon 

Gen Foods 

alt Iionlen 



Lucy 
alt 



Price Is Right 
Frigldaire 
Sterling 
Heinz sit 
EF.I 



1 Love Lucy 

Lever 
Scott 
alt Gen Fowls 



Price Is Right 
Al. Culrer 

alt I,ever 



Ml lei sit 

I<ever 



Pen Mill s 
Kodak alt Vlck 



Price Is Right 
Lerer alt 
Corn Prod 
Stand Brands 
Oen Mills 



Love Lucy 

SUst 



Fury 

Borden 



>ollar 
ate 



Concentration 
Balm sit Mile s 
Nabisco alt 
Brlllo 



Top Dollar 

Colgate 

Armstrong 

alt Gen Foods 



Concentration 

Nestle 
alt Lever 
Heinz alt 
Whitehall 



Top Dollar 

Colgate 



Concentration 

Ponds alt 
Bauer & Blsck 



Lone Ranger 

Gen Mills 



Lever alt 
Bm & Wmsn 



Circus Boy 

Miles alt sust 



f Life 

o sit 

it 

ine Prod 



Tic Tac Dough 

neinz alt 
Brn & Wmsn 



Restless Cun 



Love of Life 

(lueker alt Level 



Tic Tac Dough 
Al. CulTer 
alt Heinz 

P&.G 



Restless Cun 
sust 



Love of Life 

Lever alt Ton! 



Tic Tac Dough 

Itorden 



Oen Ml 11a 



alt Ken Gay 



Lunch With 
Soupy Sales 

Gen Foods 



Sky King 

Nabisco 



True Story 

suit 
Sterling Drug 



4 ■ For 
• rrow 

P 



Light 



Could Be You 
Whitehall alt 
Nestle 
Corn Prod 
alt Brlllo 



Love That Bob 

sust 



Search for 
Tomorrow 

P&O 



Cuiding Light 
P&O 



It Could Be 
You 
Mllea alt 

Nsblscft 



Love That Bob 

sust 



Search for 
Tomorrow 

P&G 



Guiding Light 
E&O 



Could Be You 
Stand Braodi 
alt Oongoleum 
P&G alt 



Detective Diary 
Sterlinc Dnif 



[10) lUlt 



No net service 



Music Bingo 

sust 



No n e t serv lct 

News 
(1:25-1:30) suit 



No nef service 



Music Bingo 
sust 



No n et service 

News 
(1:25-1:30) iuit 



No net service 



Mr. Wizard 
iuit 



Turns 



No net service 



As the World 
Turns 

P&O 

Pillsbury 



No net service 



World Turns 

P&O 

Quaker 
ait Gen Mills 



No net service 



■ 

| ter Or 

?Vorse 
It su st 



Queen for a 
Day 
iuit 

sust 



Day In Courf 

Drackett. 

Gen Poods 
Toni 



For Better Or 
For Worse 

Scott sit suat 
sust 
alt Lever 



Queen-Day 

sust alt 
Congoieum 

sust 
alt Miles 



Day In Court 

Armnur 
Beech-Nut 



For Better Or 
For Worse 

Lerer alt Tonl 



Queen for a 
Day 

susi alt Ponds 

Nabisco sit sust 



NCAA Football 

Arrow Shirts 
Shlck, E*so, 
Humble Oil 
Stand. Oil Ind. 



r.aJu''.U"! 

Petrol. 
BA Basketball 

(5-7) 
Vnheuser-Busch 
Bayuk-V« 



ikletter 
Bros 

[sust 
Iitlon 



The Thin Man 

sust 



Calc Storm , 

Drackett Art Linkletter 
Gen Foods K » Ho " 
Block Drue Pillsbury 



The Thin Man 

sust 



Gale Storm 

Johnson & 
Johnson 
Tonl 



Art Linkletter 
Lerer Broe 



sust alt 
Staler 



The Thin Man 
■ust 



1 



ayoff 
tau 



Young 
Dr. Ma lone 

sust 



Beat The Clock 

Drackett 
Armour 



Big Payoff 

Gen Foods 



Young 
Dr. Malone 

Supp Hose 

Bordon 



Beat The Clock 
Amer Horn* 
Beech-Nut 
Armour 



Big Payoff 
Colgate 



Young 
Dr. Malone 

sust 



■ is Yours 

ck 

V borer 

■ r alt 

■ ling 



From These 
Roots 

sust 



fir Day 

iG 



J Storm 
«se Prod 



■ F Night 
iQ 

■ ilk alt 



Who Do You 
Trust? 

Drackett 
Tonl 

Beech-Nut 



Verdict Is Yours 

terling alt sust j 
alt sust 



Carnation 
alt Scott 



From These 
Roots 

sust 



The House on 
High Street 

sust 



American 
Bandstand 

Tonl, Old 
London Foods 



Brighter Day 
P&G 



Secret Storm 

sust alt 
Amer Home 



rpht Personality 
Frigldaire 

sit sust 

Heinz alt 
SterHr, 



American 
Bandstand 

Harold Ritchie 
Block Drug 



Who Do You 
Trust? 

Lever 
General Foods 

Beech -Nut 



Verdict Is Yours 
sust alt 
Atlantis 
Oen Mills 
alt Lerer 



From These 
Roots 

sust 



The House on 
High Street 

Klelnert 
Culver alt P&G 



American 
Bandstand 

Mennen 
Amer Home 



Brighter Day 

P&G 

Secret Storm 
Amer Home Prod 
alt Gen Mills 



The House on 
High Street 
Whitehall alt 



P&G alt Ponds 



Edge of Night Split Personality 
P&O 



Plllsbury 



Heinz alt 
Oen Milla 
Lerer alt Miles 



American 
Bandstand 
lollywood Candy; 
Polk Miller 



Edge of Night 
P&G 
Amer Home 
alt 
Sterling 



Split Personality 
E E.l. alt sust 
I^ver att 
Gold Seal 



Race of the 
Week 
sust 



American 
Bandstand 
co-op 



American 
Bandstand 
co-op 



Rocky and 
His Friends 

Gen Mills 



Rin Tin Tin 

Gen Mills 



Robin Hood 

SUSt 



but list all sponsors. Monday through Friday, buying programs during month. 



"lpd progrfpis appear during this period are listed 
as well, with air dates. The only regularly scheduled pro- 
grams not listed are: Tonight, NBC, 11:15 p.m.-l a.m., 
Monday-Friday, participating sponsorship; Sunday News 



Special, CBS, Sunday, 11-11:15 p.m. (Carter and White- 
hall) ; Today, NBC, 7-9 a.m., Monday-Friday, participating; 
News CBS, 7:45-8 a.m. and 8:45-9 a.m., Monday-Friday. 
All times are Eastern Davlkrht. 



milSt reading for 
advertisers and agencies... 




The KWTV Community— 
a 54-county area — is a 
community created and held 
together by SERVICE. 
The variety, depth and quality 
of KWTV programming 
and promotion services are 
key factors in its leadership. 
Within the pages of this 
brochure, you will find 
reasons for — and evidence of 
— the remarkably keen 
communitywide interest 
which the KWTV brand of 
service generates. 
Write for your copy . . . 
you'll find it a helpful tool 
in making market coverage 
decisions. 



from 

kwtv Oklahoma citv 

Represented by 



3D BffYft*70W&M 

f The Original Station Repiesentative 




GENE AUTRY 

Starring in 56 HOUR FEATURES 

ROY ROGERS 

Starring in 67 HOUR FEATURES 




"One of soundest buys station has made." 

— KOB-TV, Albuquerque, June 9, 1959 

"Very successful ... a nice 
show to have around." 
— WBRC-TV, Birmingham, 
April 1, 1959 



REALLY 




ROPIN' IN 




RATINGS! 




Greenville, 




Spartanburg, 




Anderson 


15.3 


Lubbock 


25.9 


Columbus, Ohio 


15.0 


Memphis 


22.8 


Davenport- 




Rock Island 


21.5 


Little Rock 


15.8 


Syracuse 


23.3 


South Bend 


16.2 


Dayton 


23.8 


Charlotte, N.C 


25.9 


Peoria 


15.1 


Roanoke 


17.5 


Charleston, S.C. 


28.3 


Phoenix 


17.4 


Dallas -Ft. Worth 


15.1 



mca 

TV FILM SYNDICATION 




TV TAPE 

(Continued from page 36) 

cial leaves the producer's hands. 

The agency owns all tape recorded 
during its production sessions, as 
well as all materials prepared in con- 
nection with the commercial. 

Three copies of each commercial 
are to be delivered by the producer: 
the master, the air copy and the 
standi))' print. And they are so 
marked. 

Other areas covered by the con- 
tract are quality, approvals in pro- 
duction, changes, deliveries, coding, 
payment, performers and musicians 
and their production and use fees, 
title and limitations, storage, warran- 
ties, SAG, AFTRA and other union 
codes, ownership of rights and as- 
signment, terminations, and publicity 
and laws. 

The production contract sheet de- 
tails the number of commercials to be 
made, client, products and total 
price. Each commercial is coded, 
specified as to length, color or mono- 
chrome, production date and whether 
final sound track will include music. 
It also grants the agency duplicating 
rights. 

The talent report sheet includes 
agency code, performer's names, so- 
cial security numbers and legal ad- 
dress, parts played, talent class, num- 
ber of sessions on and off camera and 
fees paid by producer. This last item 
includes rehearsal, wardrobe and 
nverscale fees. There are more than 
10 talent classes defined: actors, an- 
nouncers, singer solo or duos, singer 
groups, dancer solo or duos, dancer 
groups, models, sound effects, extras 
and contractors. ^ 



MAXWELL HOUSE 

(Continued from page 39) 

New Yoik, for example, Maxwell 
House starts this week with 25 seg- 
ments per week in WNTA-TV's new 
IVews Break format calling for five 
90-second newscasts nightly (allowing 
for a sponsor billboard and 20-second 
commercial) . Also running in New 
York: sixteen 60s per week on 
WPIX, plus other spots. 

On 1 October alternate week spon- 
sorship of Zane Grey Theatre (with 
S. C. Johnson) gives the new com- 
mercials their first network exposure. 
The spot schedule continues with the 
same weight. 

(Please turn to page 53) 



50 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 





ALL 




Thousands of W-E-L-Islaaiers tuns in to 960 for Yale foot- 
ball! And WEXiZ keeps 'em coining lack all week-all year 
-for good music and news, and great sports coverage. WELI, 
the Sound of Hew Haven, has the audience yen must reach, 
to attract volume- sales throughout South Central Connecticut 
and Eastern long Island! Sail BIO W-E-L-Island! 



WELI • 960 • 5000 WATTS • New Haven 

H-R Representatives, National Harry Wheeler & Co., Boston 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



51 



4TH LARGEST 
TV MARKET IN 
TEXAS WITH 

152,600 TV Homes... 

20 Prosperous Counties 
and .Parishes 




SHARE OF AUDIENCE 



60 



55 




50 



Mar. 
1958 
ARB 



Nov. 
1958 
ARB 



Jan. 
1959 
ARB 



April 
1959 
ARB 



BEAUMONT 
PORT ARTHUR 
ORANGE 

BUY THE 
HOT SPOT STATION 

KFDM -TV 

CHANNEL 6 




'A 



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C. B. Locke, Executive Vice President 
& General Manager 

Mott Johnson, Sales & Operations Manager 



' r Peters-Griffin-Woodward, Inc. 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



Louisville 
. Newspapers 
Announce... 



CONTINUITY- 




| * Frequency- volume 
discounts up to 13% 

* Available in 

1 3-week cycles 

* Allows hiatus of up 
to 4 weeks per year 

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* Rates guaranteed 
for term of contract 



Get the full C-l-D 
story from your 
BRANHAM COMPANY 
representative 



The Louisville Times 



Hot Springs, Ark. 

Pop. 33,800 

is larger than 

Midland, Texas 
Pop. 64,700 

in General Merchandise Sales 

La Crosse, Wise. 
Pop. 79,700 

in Drug Store Sales 

Sheboygan, Wise. 
Pop. 91,900 

in Apparel Store Sales 

Ask Us "Why" 

KBHS 

5000 watts at 590 kc 

113 Third St., Hot Springs, Ark. 



E-TV 



DOMINATES 
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WSYR.TV ALONE DELIVERS 44,287 
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WSYR.TV AND ITS SATELLITE, 
WSYE-TV, DELIVER 73,089 MORE 
HOMES THAN ITS COMPETITOR 



'All figures NCS No. 3 weekly circulation 




MAXWELL HOUSE 

I Continued from page 50 ) 

During development of the cam- 
paign, OBM had another ball in the 
air for Maxwell House. Last June, 
a new .Maxwell House Western Blend 
was introduced in Denver and Seattle. 
The interesting point about the West- 
ern Blend campaign is its complete 
lack of similarity to the "Tastes as 
good as it smells" pitch. 

Copy reminds western coffee drink- 
ers of their preference for stronger 
coffee and highlights this feature of 
the brand with commercials geared 
to campfire scenes, lightning and a 
theme. "Hot as fire, black as night." 
Packaging departs from traditional 
Maxwell House blue with a fiery red 
can. Outdoor and newspapers arc 
tied into the introduction. 

And what next? While tv continues 
as the major medium for Maxwell 
House east of the Mississippi, in some 
southeastern markets radio is used. 
The sound and musical score has been 
transferred to the 60-second radio 
commercials intact. 

Research is continuing both in the 
western and eastern markets to ascer- 
tain if further refinements in execu- 
tion of the national and Western 
Blend advertising are needed. ^ 



wtli • smtvsi, t. • 100 

Phi VSYE-TV chMMl II ELMUU.N.Y. 



C.« »». f.ll I'— HARRINGTON, RIGHTXK ft PARSONS 



MERKEL 

{Continued from page 42) 

first selling to grocery stores and 
chains, the second to butcher stores 
and delicatessens), Merkel has a retail 
division of 52 owned and operated 
outlets. "Several outlets are in or 
near Negro areas," says Stiefel. "We 
have noticed that as high as 50% of 
the customers in stores near Negro 
areas are Negroes. It seemed we were 
missing a big bet in not directing our 
advertising especially to this market." 

Sports programing. Ever since Mer- 
kel first turned to radio five years 
ago to reach more segments of the 
market, it has used a sports feature 
as one of its mainstays. Merkel spots 
before and after Yankee baseball 
games on WMGM's IFarrnup Time 
and Sports Extra are designed to: 

• Increase brand consciousness 
among men. Hartman points out that 
ham is a product with high male 
brand awareness because it is largely 
a flavor proposition. 

• Reach a high percentage of wo- 
men in the bargain. Women form a 
large part of today's sports audience 



SPONSOR • 2G SEPTEMBER 1959 



53 



(see SPONSOR, 21 March 1959. pg. 
311. and Merkel feels it's necessary 
housewife audience is not overlooked 
in this- buv. In fact, to test female 
listenership and interest, Merkel has 
used mail-in tests from time to time 
consisting of recipe offers. "Re- 
sponse."' says Stiefel, "is probably not 
what }ou'd expect from a homemaker- 
type show, but it is always sufficient 
to indicate a substantial audience." 

• Reach kids ivith a consistent pat- 
tern. Identification with the baseball 
feature has helped Merkel get an early 
start on the kid market (till two years 
ago. the segments surrounded the 
Dodger games) . "Because it's a t\ pe 
of programing we know will always 
be around,"' says Hartman. "sports 
gives us a consistent image that can 
get brand loyalty early. Our listen- 
ers of four and five years ago are 
food purchasers today, of course." 

News. Merkel runs 20 spots per 
week adjacent to newscasts on WOR. 
These are slotted during the day for 
two reasons: (1) reaching the house- 
wife, (2) attention factor, which 
Stiefel considers high during news. 

Disk jockey shows. Merkel has 
eleven 60-second participations per 



week on WINS. Stiefel considers disk 
jockey shows a "combination audi- 
ence" buy, wrapping up the pin- 
pointed buys. He rounds out the 
schedule with Ted Brown and Peter 
Tripp shows on WMGM. 

Classical music. Merkel doesn't 
overlook the "quality" audience per 
se. goes after it wth a regular schedule 
of 31 participations per week on 
WQXR, classical music station and, 
occasionally, WPAT (Paterson, N.J.), 
which maintains a largely serious 
music format too. 

Copy also varies, of course, by 
season of the year — pork products 
being a prime example of a product 
calling for seasonal emphasis. 

For example, holiday schedules 
(which run from Thanksgiving 
through New Year's and do not pin- 
point any particular clay copy-wise) 
are not confined to pushing ham 
alone. Other products mentioned are 
mentioned for a reason, however. For 
example, sausage. Says Stiefel, 
"There's more than one big day in 
this period, and if a turkey's going to 
wind up on the table, sausage com- 
mercials can serve as a reminder that 
this product is an excellent stuffing." 



Using this media and copy strategy 
for five years, Merkel has increased 
its sales 30/f. Its media breakdown 
is prettj well established: radio, 
50/< ; transportation cards, 20/? ; 
newspapers, 109? ; trade ads, promo- 
tions, point of sale material and ad- 
vertising production costs, 20??. 

However. Merkel's advertising and 
merchandising reach doesn't stop 
with its own media buying, promo- 
tion and sales force efforts. In fact, 
Merkel has developed a technique 
(which many advertisers are studying 
with interest) of doubling its adver- 
tising and merchandising impact 
through promotions with other prod- 
ucts. One example is a joint Yankee 
schedule distributed in supermarkets 
by Merkel and Mrs. Wagner's Pies 
(a Hartman client also participating 
in the WMGM baseball warmup and 
roundup segments). 

But a more significant and involved 
tie-in was the recent "beer and knock- 
vvurst festival" promotion with Knick- 
erbocker Beer (through Compton). 
Next week SPONSOR will look at this 
promotion in detail as part of a case 
study of Knickerbocker's tv merchan- 
dising strategy. 4r 





Selling the Rochester, New York, market 




SVMBOL OF SERVICER I 




•«Sf 



TRANSCONTINENT STATION 



DETROIT'S BIG THREE 

(Continued from page 34) 

2. Changes in media thinking: 

With Detroit poised for a plunge 
into a new era, broadcast media 
should ho thinking along similar 
lines. There is no doubt tv can 
supply the "emotional" appeal which 
seems to sell cars today. '"1 was driv- 
ing along the highway the other day," 
an adman said, "when I saw — out in 
front of an auto dealer s— a car with 
three plastic balloons flapping out- 
side the window. I didn't need to 
recognize a car name or insignia: 
I'd seen the whole scene reconstructed 
often before on tv. The balloons 
said, "This is Renault.' " 

Renault tv commercials this year 
have stressed the fun of driving this 
particular car, and the balloons gaily 
flying have accented this fun. Re- 
nault, incidentally, is one of the for- 
eign brands that have stolen a lot of 
thunder from the Big Three's share 
of market. Tv has become so im- 
portant in its thinking that it has 
split agencies, retaining Needham, 
Louis & Brorby in Chicago to handle 
its print, but giving to Kudner in 
New York its air media budget. 



Color tv is becoming another fac- 
tor in Detroit's changing views on 
media. \\ here once automotive!* leaned 
toward national magazines because 
they could offer color plates, the) are 
now asking tv for more color. Just 
about all the network tv this season 
bought by automotive* is being tele- 
cast in color to show off their ears to 
the best advantage. "1 wonder." re- 
marked one adman, "how many local 
auto dealers have had the foresight 
to install color tv sets in their show- 
rooms and invite prospects in to 
watch?" 

Another thing that the Big Three 
have learned through bringing out the 
compact, economy cars this fall is their 
consumer target. Basically, tbev are 
appealing to the elderly, the newly- 
weds and the low and middle-class 
income groups. Air media has demon- 
strated its ability to bit such targets. 

3. Changes in advertising copy: 
As mentioned before, tv has proved 
it can handle an emotional appeal: 
radio can do a similar job along with 
delivering reminders. The old ''nuts- 
and-bolts'' advertising of automotives 
which stressed horsepower and me- 
chanical attributes gave wav to an 



era where interior »lj ling and flashy 
tail fins were emphasized as an appeal 
to the detail >i<le. Now it would ap- 
pear that, with the introduction of 
the smaller ears, the cop\ appeal w ill 
hit ecoiiomj of performance and the 
sheer fun of driving a car that 
"doesn't drive \ ou." (There will be 
,-ome interesting sidelight battles for 
awhile on the rear engine I Corvair 
I-; the onI\ I .S. car with one) and 
the engine in front { Falcon and 
Valiant have this). But this copy 
battle will probabh fade away before 
the greater approach of fun on the 
road. It can be expected that Stude- 
baker-l'aekard's Lark w Inch comes out 
this year with the onh convertible in 
I'.S. small cars ( the\ re more expen- 
sive due to more handwork and so 
other small car> are avoiding them ) 
will carry the "fun" theme to a fare- 
thee-well. At any event, as the fun 
idea builds, tv will be used to demon- 
strate the fun. radio to personif) it 
with happ\ jingles. 

Another trend, which should prove 
a boon to spot tv. may be the use of 
shorter commercials for the shorter 
cars. Rambler, for example, has 
{Please lum to page 58) 




GREATER COVERAGE in the thriving 13-councy market surrounding Rochester, N. Y., is just one important reason 
why more and more advertisers select WROC-TV for successful selling campaigns and new-product tests. In this rich 
Western New York area, with its heavy concentration of highly skilled industrial and specialized agricultural workers, more 
than a million people spend over $2 billion a year for products and services. 

According to Nielsen (NCS #3), WROC-TV— celebrating its tenth anniversary this year— provides advertisers with 
considerably greater coverage of this two-channel market than its competitor. Using a standard 25% cut-off point (based 
on number of TV homes in a county that view a station at least one night a week), NCS #3 shows the competitive channel 
adequately covering only seven of the 13 counties reached by WROC-TV. 

In terms of viewer homes reached daily, this means WROC-TV delivers to advertisers 42% more coverage in the daytime 
...31% more coverage in the evening. 

For information about specific availabilities and how you can reach more adults on WROC-TV, Rochesters first and 
most powerful station, call your Petry television representative. 



NBC-ABC • CHANNEL 5 • ROCHESTER 




WGR.TV, W0R, Buffalo, N, Y. • WROC-TV Rochester, N. Y s » WNEP-TY, Scranton— Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
WSVATV, WSVA* Harrisonljurg, Va. • K?M&-TV KFMB, San Onega, Calif. » KERQvTAf Bakersfteld, Calif. 



As criticism off ratings continues, SPONSOR ASKS: 



With what would you replace 

the rating system? 




Agency, research and broadcast 
men discuss ratings' limitations, 
tell what would be a better ap- 
proach to audience measurement 

Myron A. Mahler, sr. r.p. and creative 
dir. of air media, Mogul Williams & Savior, 
Inc., New York 
I would never suggest that the rat- 
ing services have outlived their use- 
fulness, but they must be placed in 
proper perspective as only one of the 



comprehensive 
audience 
composition 
measurement 



inter-related factors that form the 
basis of our total judgment. 

One of the most vital failings of 
the rating services is in their lack of 
a qualitative evaluation of an audi- 
ence. We're informed of the total 
number of sets tuned in to a program. 
But what is far more important to 
an advertiser is: how many people 
did the commercial reach? 

Where the rating services have 
failed also is in their inability, cither 
by virtue of prohibitive costs or for 
other reasons, to supply documented 
facts relating to the make-up of an 
audience. Sure, one program will gar- 
ner a 30 rating. But what I want to 
know is: what does the 30 represent? 
If 20 points of the 30 rating stands 
for aging matriarchs, too feeble to 
"rush down to the corner supermar- 
ket." 1 want to know about it. Con- 
versely, if a 15 rating means that a 
sizable portion of the audience is 
composed of medium-income groups 
with high-level purchasing power. I 
want to know that, too. 

If we concede that the rating serv- 
ices are not equipped to provide this 
information — and it's time the con- 
cession was made — we must look else- 
where. The problem is — where? 

To gain a well-rounded picture of 



audience composition, MW&S has 
relied on research to supplement the 
rating information. Not just surface 
research, hut hard-core investigation 
of how effective a program, or a com- 
mercial, is at the crucial sales level. 

For one of our accounts, Knomark, 
Inc. (Esquire shoe polishes), we've 
been conducting a continuous re- 
search program in 20 cities for several 
years. Without revealing mechanics 
of the program, I can state that we've 
learned more about a sponsored pro- 
gram or a commercial campaign via 
our own research than we have from 
the available ratings. 

The only solution, as I see it, is a 
concerted effort by broadcasters, 
agencies, and advertisers ... a jointly 
financed program of cooperation to 
underwrite the cost of developing a 
totally new kind of comprehensive 
measurement that would provide us 
all with the "who" of the audience as 
well as the "how many." 

J. J. Hartigan, sr. v.p., Campbell-Etvald 
Co. inc., Detroit 

Without directly criticizing the cur- 
rent rating systems — which involve a 
lot of sincere effort, I'm sure — I 
would like to point out what the Audit 
Bureau of Circulation has done for 
the media man. 

Before this organization was estab- 
lished, circulation figures were a mo- 
rass of conflicting statistics, claims 
and counter-claims. The media buyer 
was forced to fall back on experience 



Perlwps an 
impartial 
controlling 
organization 



and judgment with few irrefutable 
facts to support his opinion. 

The situation today has vastly im- 
proved. ABC figures are completely 
reliable. The media man has time to 
devote himself to the specific market- 




ing problems of his product and ar- 
rive at solutions that make media 
huying the science it has become. 

Noteworthy, I think, is the consti- 
tution of the ABC as an independent, 
non-profit operation. It is controlled 
by a board in which publishers, ad- 
vertisers and agencies have a voice. 
It is impartial and has contributed 
a real measure of dignity and integ- 
rity to the advertising profession. 

¥> 

Paul Evans, national sales mgr., WIP, 
Philadelphia 

In the print field the choice is rela- 
tively simple. Magazines and news- 
papers are designed to reach a partic- 
ular facet of the market, i.e., the city 
audience, the rural audience, the teen- 
age girl, the mature woman, etc. 

But, in broadcasting, the problem 
becomes infinitely more difficult. The 



Station 
ability to sell 
merchandise 
should be guide 



composition of the audience delivered 
by any radio station is heterogeneous. 
All too frequently, the national ad- 
vertiser and his agency buying in 
various markets, throw up their hands 
in despair at sorting out the audience. 
They seem to settle for a basic belief 
■that the more people they reach in 
any given quarter hour, the more peo- 
ple will react to their message. 

The blunderbuss approach is noth- 
ing more than an easy way out. All 
too often, it is wastefully expensive in 
terms of results. It certainly does not 
guarantee performance of the type 
the advertiser is seeking — sales! 

The answer is to give proper weight 
to the local acceptance of the station 
in question. Look for the station 
which has good local acceptance by 
the merchants of the community. Lo- 
cal merchants do little institutional 
advertising. They seek to sell goods 




56 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



and they are able lo determine, al- 
most immediately, the results of their 
advertising. The .station to which 
they give local acceptance is the one 
which can perform the prime func- 
tion of its existence for the advertiser 
— move merchandise! 

Briefly, then, why can t actual per- 
formance of the station's ability to 
sell merchandise be the guide, rather 
than characterized primarily b) their 
wide divergence of results? 

Dr. Charles West, pres., Resin Re- 
search Co., Newark 

Up until the present time the only 
method of the determining the num- 
ber of eonsumer-viewers that were 
watching a given tv show had been 
the rating sen ices. My associates and 
I have invented a device which, I 
think, will lend a far more scientific 
approaeh to the field. 

Our deviee is an electronic machine, 
which can be set up in some 200 ke) 




Electronic 
device to 
determine 
results 



network cities at point of sale loca- 
tions. The machine looks like an 
open voting booth with buttons list- 
ing nationally advertised products 
that sponsor tv shows, and questions 
pertaining to these products. The 
consumer will be given an induce- 
ment such as a tag which will come 
out of the machine, listing a number 
with prizes to be awarded to the 
holder of the winning number. Each 
da}, at central headquarters, a na- 
tional number will be drawn, there 
will be one winner of fabulous prizes, 
in each city. The machine will con- 
tain the following questions: 

1. What product did you bu} to- 
day? 

2. Why did you buy this product? 

3. How did )ou hear about it? 

4. Do you like the sponsor's tv 
show ? 

5. How long did }ou watch the 
program prior to purchase? 

As researchers on various projects 
for Standard Oil Of \e\v Jersey, Ar- 
mour & Co., and the U. S. govern- 
ment, we feel that this device is as 
workable and more useful than the 
current rating systems. ^ 

SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 





You score every time on WLUK-TV 




r 




as* 



2k 



J>. --■->• 



You score every time on WLUK-TV, the most powerful TV station in Wisconsin's wealthy 
Green Bay — Fox River Valley market. WLUK-TV reaches more than 1,500,000 persons 
in 53 counties in Wisconsin and Michigan. Want results? Then you gotta have 'LUK ! 



WLUK TVl a I CHANNEL 11 



and Fox River Valle 



- Joseph D. Mackin, general manager 



^ Represented Nationally by Geo. P. Hollingberry. In Minneapolis see Bill Hurley. 

EXTRA! Get both WLUK-TV and WL.UC-TV, Channel' 6~ -Upper Michigan's ONLY 
.TV station, with one buy. Check with Hollingberry for the full story. -- 



DETROIT'S BIG THREE 

(Continued from page 55) 
found it can do well with quickie 
commercials, uses them in conjunc- 
tion with some longies. 

4. Changes in marketing: 
George Ronnie) . head of American 
Motors who pioneered the recent 
U.S. trend to small car production 
with Rambler, estimates that by 1965. 
half of all cars sold will be compact 
ones. If his estimate proves correct 
or nearly so. then it will mean that 
brand lines will be sharply divided 
between compacts and larger "status 
symbols" just as the soap industry 
has divided its product Hue between 



soaps and detergents. An) such move 
demands new marketing strategies, 
new ad approaches to reach both ex- 
tremes of the consuming puhlic. No 
longer will it he reasonable to expect 
a single brand car to run away with 
the entire market. The flexibility of 
air media will be well suited to han- 
dle such diversification. 

What has already been apparent 
in the automotive business is that the 
concept of seasonal buying peaks lias 
become passe. Today, with bigger 
and better highways which make 
motoring relatively comfortable in all 
weather, cars are bought when need- 
ed — not just in fall at new model time 



and in spring for summer touring. 
This new concept can well spell out 
more consistent, year-round air cam- 
paigns. 

The changing — or what appears to 
be changing — role of the local auto 
dealer in his relation to Detroit is 
another factor that broadcasters and 
advertisers should watch closely. He 
is no longer the recipient of big co-op 
donations from the factory, but 
neither is he as completely under 
their heel as he once was. This does 
not mean he is as autonomous as he 
might like to be (it is possible some 
Dodge dealers who must give up 
Plymouth to handle the new Dart 
may, for example, be slightly less 
than happy), but he is gaining 
stature in his community and in the 
Motor City. As the product lines of 
Detroit become further diversified 
(more compact cars are in the offing 
for all the Big Three), the power of 
the local dealers is likely to increase 
still more. With this in sight, broad- 
cast media cannot afford to neglect 
them and their dealer organizations 
in pitches. The strength of air media 
is still at the local level, and the 
dealers are a direct pipeline to the 
strategy-makers in Detroit. ^ 




IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

« KHSL-TV « 

CHICO, CALIFORNIA 

Represented Nationally by: 

AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 




ADVENTURES 
IN... 



music 

news 

ideas 

thought 

sound 




ADULT RADIO 

DIAL 10 or 100 william v. stewart, president 



NATIONALLY: DAREN F. McGAVREN COMPANY, INC. 



MORE OF YOUR SIOUX CITY CUSTOMERS ARE WATCHING KVTV 



Whether it's mid-morning or 4:00 P.M.* when the KVTV Players stage one of their special production intros 
to the "My Little Margie" show. Such quality programming results in more viewers. 

No matter what time it is right now, call your Katz man. Ask to see his latest ARB which proves why KVTV 
is the best buy in Sioux City. 

*The KVTV Players feature Roland King and are directed by Jim Henry. These talented players are available 
for the production of special "live spots" to add "more sell" to your sales message, thus increasing the sale of 
your product in Sioux City. 




HERE'S 

the place to look for 

BUSINESS 



TALLAHASSEE 
T H O M A S V I L L E 



SPOT TV'S TOP lOO 




the bright spot in your 
sales picture . . . WCTV- 
can make it brighter! 

With the great CBS programs, 
plus top ABC -TV shows, 
WCTV provides standout 
service to a most responsive 
market. In the entire U.S., 
Tallahassee stands fifth in re- 
tail sales per household.* 

For many leading brands, 
the Tallahassee - Thomasville 
Market deserves and gets 
strong spot schedules. A siz- 
able market - over 225,000 
families — 52 counties — effec- 
tively covered by WCTV. Get 
the complete picture from 
Blair Television Associates. 

'''Annual Survey of Buying Power, 
1959. 

WCTV 



TALLAHASSEE 



C^A/f THOMASVILLE 

^S'a John H. Phipps 
Broadcasting Station 



BLAIR TELEVISION ASSOOIATES 

National Representatives 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
38. 
39. 
40. 
41. 
42. 
43. 
44. 
45. 
46. 
47. 
48. 
49. 
50. 



Procter & Gamble . 

Adell Chemical 

Colgate-Palmolive ... 

General Foods 

Lever Brothers _ 

Cont. Baking 



American Home Prods 

Miles Laboratories 

Warner-Lambert Pharma... 

Brown & Williamson 

Borden 

Kellogg 

J. A. Folger 

International Latex 

Texize Chemicals 

Revlon 

Philip Morris 

Ford Motors, Reg. Dlrs. ... 
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco ... 

Bristol-Myers 

Corn Products 

Anheuser-Busch 

Carter Products 

P. Lorillard .... 

General Mills _ 

Coca-Cola Bottlers 

Avon Products ... _ 

Standard Brands _ 

Robert Hall 

Andrew Jergens 

Sterling Drug 

Pepsi-Cola Bottlers .. 

W ard Baking _ 

Lanolin Plus 

American Tobacco 

Welch Grape Juice — 

Pam Enterprises 

Food Mjgrs 

Gen. Motors, Reg. Dlrs. ... 

National Biscuit 

Ruppert Brewery 

Drug Research Corp 

Liggett & Myers Tob 

Pabst Brewing 

Carling Brewing _ 

Gillette _ 

Purex Corp 

Wesson Oil & Snow Drift 

Shell Oil .... 

Cont. Wax 



$11,764,800 


51. 


4,581,700 


52. 


3,839,100 


53. 


3,831,700 


54. 


3,276,400 


55. 


2,801,000 


56. 


2,348,300 


57. 


2,004,300 


53. 


1,990,200 


59. 


1,889,200 


60. 


1,739,200 


61. 


1,662,600 


62. 


1,463,300 


63. 


1,409,100 


64. 


1,345,800 


65. 


1,323,000 


66. 


1,301,900 


67. 


1,191,300 


68. 


1 1 O n cnn 

l,lo9,oUQ 


69. 


1 ICO Oftfl 


70. 


1 1/in onn 

i,i4u,yuu 


71. 


1 100 Al\l\ 


72. 


i iic nnn 
1,11 D,UUU 


73. 


1 i m /inn 
1 , 1 U/,4UU 


74. 


1,098,300 


75. 


962,700 




76. 


949, OUU 




77. 


943,900 




7ft 


QQ/t Rfifi 
JUU 






O / u,*tUU 


on 


ocn onn 
00b, ZUU 


OU. 


oca enn 


81. 


82. 


Q/to inn 
o4z,/UU 




799,700 


83. 


84. 


793,200 




85. 


738,200 




86. 


729,000 


. 87. 


727,500 


88. 


725,700 


89. 


707,500 




90. 


703,000 


91. 


683,000 


92. 


679,500 


93. 


679,400 


94. 


670,600 


95. 


664,200 


96. 


663,100 


97. 


657,100 


98. 


634,500 


99. 


617,100 


100. 



Tidewater Oil .. ._..$ 612,500 

B. T. Babbitt Co. .. 611,800 

Norwich Pharmacol 601,900 

Falstaff Brewing 589,900 

Sun Oil 585,400 

Theo. Hamm Brewing .... 582,200 

Pharma-Crajt 573,000 

Hertz _ 542,100 

American Motors 541,100 

Helena Rubinstein _ 530,000 

S. O. Co. (Calif.) 527,900 

Parker Pen _ 516,200 

Sonny Boy 507,900 

Wrigley _. 495,900 

Esso S. O. _.. 481,000 

U. S. Rubber 472,500 

Exquisite Form _ 470,900 

U. S. Borax & Chem. _ 465,300 

Alberto-Culver _ _ 461,300 

Ralston-Purina 461,100 

Uelene Curtis _ _ 457,700 

Assoc. Products 455,500 

E. F. Drew Co. .„ 448,800 

S. O. Co. (Ind.) 422,400 

American Chicle 440,600 

Natl Cranberry Assoc 439,200 

Dujjy-Mott 439,100 

Schlitz Brewing 437,800 

Atlantic Refining 435,900 

Revere Camera 432,200 

Chock-full -o Nuts 421,500 

Wilson - ~ 421,300 

M. J. B. Co 418,700 

Armour - - 418,400 

Max Factor 416,700 

Safeway Stores 408,800 

S. C. Johnson 393,300 

American Bakeries 391,300 

Pacific T. & T 388,600 

Ballandne .~ 383,500 

Chrysler, Reg. Dlrs _ 381,200 

Glamorene - 376,000 

Salada-Shirriff-Horsey 375,600 

Bon Ami 368,900 

Dr. Pepper Bottlers 366,500 

Interstate Bakeries 358,200 

National Brewing 356,900 

Block Drug 356,300 

Beech-Nut Life Savers 345,600 

Philco - 354,200 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 




PAIR OF POWERHOUSES . . . 

In Football: The Big Red of Oklahoma University! 
In Southwest Advertising: KRMG, Tulsa ! 



At&AIG- SO.OOO WATTS 
TULSA. OKLAHOMA 
OS MV/M CO/VTOUR 740X0. 



KANS. 




O K LA HOI7IA 



TEXAS 



VI O. 



ARK. 



You certainly call the right play when you back 
your line with Regional KRMG, Tulsa. KRMG's 
power-packed 50,000 watts on 740 serve a loyal 
audience in 5 states which spends $2,740,000,000 
annually. 

24 hours every day, people tune to KRMG for bal- 
anced programming. Pick a powerhouse — pick 
KRMG, CBS for Tulsa and all Oklahoma. 



KANSAS CITY 
SYRACUSE 
PHOENIX 
OMAHA 

TULSA 



KCMO 
WHEN 
KPHO 
WOW 

KRMG 



KCMO-TV 
WHEN-TV 
KPHO-TV 
WOW-TV 



The Katz Agency 
The Katz Agency 
The Katz Agency 
John Blair & Co. 

— BlaiKTV 
John Blair & Co, 



Meredith Stations Are Affiliated With 

BETTER HOMES & GARDENS • SUCCESSFUL FARMING Magazines 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



61 









TELEPUI 


-SE 




RATINGS: TOP SPO" 








Top 10 shows in 10 or more 
markets: 18 June-15 July lyiy 
TITLE, SYNDICATOR, SHOW TYPE 


National 
average 


7-STATI0N 
MARKETS 


5-STA. 
MARKET 


4-STATION MARKETS 




N.Y, 


L.A. 


Seattle 


Chicago Detroit Minpls. St. Louis San Fran. Wash. 


Atlanta Bait. Boston Buffalo Cine. 


Highway Patrol 

ziv (Adventure) 


1 5.5 


9.7 6.9 

wrca-tv kttv 
7:00pm 8:00pm 

12.4 6.7 

wrca-tv krca-tv 
]0:30pm 10:30pm 


1 6.9 

komo-tv 
6:30pm 


1 2.5 1 4.9 1 5.9 1 3.5 1 0.5 

wgn-tv kstp-tv ksd-tv kron-tv wtop-tv 
9:30pm 9:30pm 9 :30pm 6:30pm 7:00pm 


18.9 13.8 18.9 11.2 21. 

waga-tv wmar-tv wbz-tv wor-tv wkrc-! 
9 :00pm 7 :00pm 7 :00pm 7 :00pm 10:30,; 


Mike Hammer 

mca (Mystery) 


1 5.2 


16.9 

klne-tv 
10:00pm 


11.5 12.4 13.5 14.9 

wgn-tv k* il - tv kron - 1 v wre- tv 
9:30pm 10:00pm 10:30pm 10:30pm 


12.5 15.2 14.4 21.J 

wlw-tv wnac-tv wgr-tv wkre-t 
10:30pm 7:00pm 10:30pm 9:00pi 


Sea nunr 

ziv (Adventure) 


1 A A 

14.4 


6.7 8.4 

wabc-tv krca-tv 
10:30pm 10:30pm 


15.2 

king-tv 
10:00pm 


19.5 14.2 16.2 16.2 8.5 

wnbq-tv wtcn-tv ktvi-tv kron-tv wmal-tv 
9:30pm 9:00pm 9:30pm 7:00pra 10:00pm 


12.9 4.0 14.9 20.0 9.5 

wsb-tv wbal-tv whdh-tv wkbw-tv wkre-t 
7:00pm 10:30pm 10:30pm 10:30pm 7:30pi 


Ueatrt Valley ways 

u.s. borax (Western) 


14.2 


10.2 9.4 

wrca-tv krca-tv 
10 :00pm 7:00pm 


15.5 

king-tv 
9:00pm 


11.5 14.5 17.2 11.5 10.5 10.9 

wgn*tv wwj-tv weco-tv ktvi-tv kpix-tv wrc-tv 
9:30pm 7:00pm 9:30pm 9:30pm 10:30pm 7:00pm 


12.9 18.3 13.5 14.9 13.J 

wsb-tv wjz-tv wbz-tv wben-tv wkre-t 
7 :00|im 7 :30pm 10 :30pm 7 :00pm 7 :00pi 


Macrvenzie s riaiaers 

ziv (Adventure) 


13.3 


4.7 

webs-tv 

8:00pm 


10.5 

komo-tv 
9 :30pm 


17.9 12.5 14.5 8.5 6.2 9.5 

wnbq-tv wxyz-tv kstp-tv ktvi-tv kplx-tv wtop-tv 
9 :30pm 7 :00pm 9 :30pm 10 :00pm 8 :00pm 7 :30pm 


14.2 11.3 10.2 11.3 

wsb-tv wbal-tv wben-tv wkve-t 
7:00pm 10:30pra 7:00rmi 7:00pr 


\j. 3. rviarsna. 

nta (Western) 


1 3.2 


13.2 

wrca-tv 

10:30pm 


3.2 

ktnt-tv 
8:00pm 


8.3 16.5 12.2 9.9 14.5 12.2 

wbkij-tv wwj-tv kstp-tv ksd-tv kron-tv wrc-tv 
9:00pm 10:30pm 10:30pra 10 :00pm 7:00pm 10:30pm 


15.4 5.0 15.9 6.9 1 5.1 

waga-tv wha]-tv wnac-tv wkbw-tv wepo-t] 
10:30pm 10:30pm 10:30pni 9:30pin 9:30prl 


Flight 

rngnr 

cnp (Adventure) 


13.1 




12.2 

king-tv 
9:30pm 


4.9 13.5 4.9 6.2 

wpn-tv kstp-tv ktvu-tv wrc-tv 
8 :00pm 9 :30Dm 7 :30pm 6 :00pm 


10.9 22.5 9.9 9.9 1 lA 

wagi-tv wjz-tv wbz-tv wgr-tv wepo-t| 
8:00pm 10:00pra 4:30pm 10:30pm 10:30pl 


Rescue 8 

screen gems (Adventure) j 


12.5 


3.4 8.2 

wabc-tv krca-tv 
10:30pm 7:00pm 


AJL.KJ 

king-tv 
9:30pra 


7 O lOO llO 
/.X 14,31 x.y 1 1 .y 

wgn-tv wcoo-tv ksd-tv kron-tv 1 

8 :30pm 7 :30pm 9 :30pm fi :30pni 


1*» C JL Q I ft C lift 1 A t 

wsb-tv whal-tv wnac-te wgr-tv wlw-| 
10:30pm 7:00pm 7:30pm 7:30pm 10:30pi 


Twenty-Six Men 

abc (Western) ! 


12.2 


1.9 6.2 

wpix krca-tv 
9:30pm 7:00pm 


12.5 

komo-tv 
6:00 pm 


13.2 14.2 9.9 

wgn-tv wxyz-tv wmal-tv 
8:00pm 7:00pm 6:30pm 


8.0 17.5 15.2 11.9 

wlw-a wbz-tv wgr-tv w]w-t 
6:30pm 7:00pm 10:30pm 7:00pn 


Colonel Flack 

ess (Adventure) 


12.0 




12.5 

king-tv 
9:30pm 


6.5 11.5 13.5 10.2 7.9 

whkh-tv wwj-tv ksd-tv kron-tv wrc-tv 
9:30pm 7:00pm 9:30pm 7:30pm 7:30pm 


14.9 6.5 

wben-tv wkrc-t$ 
7:30pm 7:00pB| 














Top 10 shows in 4 to 9 markets 


If You Had A Million 

mca (Drama) 


14.7 


8.4 

wrca-tv 
7 :00pm 






13.2 

wsb-tv 
10:30pm 


Badge 714 

cn p (Mystery) 


12.5 






6.4 11.9 10.2 

wnbq-tv kstp-tv wttg-tv 
10:00pm 10:30pm 7:30pm 


10.9 

wmai-tv 

6:30pm 


Target 

«* (Adventure) 


12.0 


3.4 

wabc-tv 
10:00pm 


16.2 

king-tv 
9:00pm 


5.7 

weco-tv 
10:30pm 


25.5 8.9 

when-tv wkre-tv 
9:30pm 7:00pm 


Kit Carson 

mca (Western) 


11.4 




7.2 

king-tv 
5:00pm 


7.2 

wtcn-tv 
4:30pm 


8.9 

wcpo-tv 
6:00pm 


Casey Jones 

screen gems (Adventure) 


11.1 






7.5 4.2 

wgn-tv wtcn-tv 
7:30pm 5:00pm 


11.5 8.5 

wbz-tv wgr-tv 
6:15pm 6:00pm 


1 Search for Adventure 

bagnall (Adventure) 


11.0 


4.2 

kcop-tv 
7:00pm 




6.9 

wttg-tv 
7 :30pm 


13.2 

wlw-t 
7 :00pm 


Honeymooners 

«s (Comedy) 


10.9 


2.0 

wpix 
10 :30pm 




9.2 2.9 12.2 

wwj-tv kmsp-tv kron-tv 
7:00pm 8:30pm 6:30pm 


18.5 

wnac-tv 
7:30pm 


Man Without A Cun 

nta (Western) 


10.8 


6.7 

kttv 
8:00pm 




4.0 7.9 4.5 

kmsp-tv ktvl-tv ktvu-tv 
7:00pm 10:00pm 7:30pm 


11.2 11.4 

wsb-tv wkbw-tv 
7 -.30pm 10:30pm 


Cray Chost 

«s (Adventure) 


10.7 






4.5 7.5 9.9 

wxyz-tv kgo-tv wrc-tv 
11:00pm 10:00pm 7:00pm 




Code Three 

hal roach (Adventure) 


10.6 






13.2 6.5 3.8 

wjbk-tv kplr-tv wmal-tv 
7:30pm 9:30pm 11:00pm 


16.8 

wjz-tv 
7:30pm 


Divorce Court 

guild (Drama) 


10.6 


7.4 

kttv 

9:00pm 


19.3 

klng-tv 
9:00pm 


4.2 13.8 4.6 15.2 

wgn-tv wjbk-tv weco-tv kron-tv 
10:00pm 7:00pm 11 :00pm 6:00pm 


9.4 

whdh-tv 
10 :00pm 



31 LM SHOWS 



1 V QTATIHM 

■ i-3 i n i lun m An i\ t I 3 


2-STATION MARKETS 


"1 Col. Milw. New Or. Phlla. 


8irm. Dayton Prov. 


IlJ 19.9 24.2 16.2 12.0 

1 wbns-tv wtmj-tv vvdsu-tv w-rcv-tv 
I S :30pm 9:30pm 10:00pm 10.30nin 


20.3 21.5 

wbrr-tv wjar-tv 
9:30pm 10 30nm 


ill 19.5 

wwi-tv 


16.0 26.0 

wapi-tv whio-tv 
U :30pm 8:3(»pni 


?J 17.9 13.5 21.9 16.0 

w*ns-tv wisn-tv wdsu-tv wfil-tv 
' m 7:30pm a. OOpm 0:30pm 7:00pm 


21.8 15.3 15.3 

,vbrc-tv whv-d wpro-tv 
9 30pin 10:30pm 7 OOpm 


HI 20.2 11.5 16.2 16.9 

1 wbns-tv wisn-tv wdsu-tv WTcv-tv 
1 9:30pm 0:30pm 6:30pm 7:IM)pm 


15.8 18.5 12.3 

wbrc-tv whv-d wjar-tv 
1 0:(M>pm 7:00pm 7:n*(Jpm 


111 13.9 15.9 21.9 

I wbns-tv wisn-tv wwl-tv 
1 7:30pm «'30pm 7:30pm 


23.8 19.3 

whrc-tv wlw-d 
X :30pm 7. OOpm 


S.1 23.5 17.9 12.5 

1 wtvn tv wdsu-tv wfil-tv 
)(1 10:30pm 10 OOpm 9:30pm 


16.8 18.3 13.8 

whrc-tv whiotv wpro-tv 
10 00pm 7:00pm 10.30pm 


l\ 8.2 24.2 16.5 17.5 

-1 wlw-c wtinj-tv wdsu-tv wfll-tv 
ill 10:30pm 9:30pm 9:30pm 9:30pm 


23.3 11.3 

whio tv wprr>-tv 
8:30pm 7:00pm 


4.1 11.9 21.5 13.2 14.5 

:>■ wtvn- tv u-tnij-tv wwl-tv wrcv- tv 
<1 10 :30pm 8:00pm 6:30pm 7:00pm 


15.3 6.3 17.8 

wapi-tv whv-d wjar-tv 
9.30pm 6:00pm 7:00pm 


If 8.9 10.2 14.5 

A whv-c wisn-tv tttlsu tv 
J 7:00pm 9:00pm 10:30pm 


22.8 18.3 10.3 

wbrc-tv wlw-d wjar-tv 
9:30pm 7:00pru 7 :00pm 


1 20.5 

J wdsu-tv 
li 9:30pm 


19.3 

whio- tv 
7:30pm 




' ilk 




14.5 

u m - tv 
7:00pm 


20.8 16.8 

wbrc-tv whio-tv 
li :30pm 10:00pm 


14.5 

wdsu-tv 
10:30pm 


21.3 

whio-tv 
10:30pm 


19.0 . 5.5 

wisn-tv wcau-tv 
9:30pm 3:30pm 




19.9 

v wfll-tv 
.1 7 :30pm 


1 1.8 

wbrc-tv 
11 :30am 


15.5 

ndsfu tv 

n 6:00pm 


18.0 

wlw-d 
7:00pm 


16.2 

wbns-tv 
S :30pm 


14.3 

wlw-d 
7:00pm 


13.2 10.9 

wbns-tv wicv-tv 
7:30pm 7:00pm 


18.3 

whio-tv 
7:30pm 


13.5 18.9 1 

ulw-c wwl-tv 
6:00pin 10:00pm 


18.8 

whio- tv 
7:00pm 




20.8 

wbrc-tv 
7 :00pm 


tv 
n 








— . L r* rt ".\ , a , t ;*^ S • 



KEPR-TV 




darn right 
It s big, 
Smidley. 

'm not talking about square 
Check the figures if you must, 
ley. You'll find there are more 
sales in the Cascade network 
iv\ than Dayton, Ohio. More gas 
station sales than San Francisco. 
And on and on. Then, just remem- 
ber, the Cascade four-station net- 
work alone reaches the entire mar- 
ket and that beats the daylight out 
of a four, three or even a two-station 
market. 





TELEVISION 

KIMA-TV »■""■'*"*•■ 

KLEW-TV lE 



KfPP.JY r»sco. iichiand 



KBAS-TV MOSES lAKE, WASH 



KENNEWICK. WASH 
EWISTON. IDA 



For facts and Figures: 

National Representatives: Pacific Northwest; 

GEORGE P. HOUINGBERY Company MOORE 4\ ASSOCIATES 



[ Pulse's own. Pulse determines number by meisurinr which it*. 
\ ictually received by homes In the metropolitan tret of a flren mar- 
iiough station Itself may be outside metropolitan area of the m^ket 



63 



I 



NEWS & IDEA 

WRAP-UP 



RIDING HIGH since 1922, pioneer station WGY joins Schenectady's sesquice:itennial parade 
with Dodge of same year. Driving: Mrs. Pauline Snook, surrounded by WGYers and their children 




'IT STARTED WITH A KISS/ new MGM movie, was co-premiered by Cleveland's WHK, 
who borrowed $40,000 car starring in picture, added provocative, puctered-up model and posed 
both in front of theater and shopping centers. Free kisses (candy, that is) were had by all passersby 



64 



ADVERTISERS 



The NAB's Tv Code Review 
Board got heavy newsprint ex- 
posure this week for its report 
on "sensitive" and personal 
product advertising. 

The report related that a survey on 
audience attitudes toward tv adver- 
tising revealed "negative opinions" 
that the hoard thought would be of 
"great interest to responsible adver- 
tisers, their agencies and to broad- 
casters." 

This challenging comment, noted 
the board, has been steadily increas- 
ing, and hence the board thought it 
would be incumbent upon it to point 
out not only the NAB's canons of 
good taste but how copywriters could 
go about preparing commercials that 
would (1) be in keeping with the 
code; (2) ease objections from 
viewers. 

Appended to the report was a "set 
of coniinon-sense guideposts," or 



. . . AND ENDED WITH ONE for KOIL 
space jockey Jim Hummel, warmly welcomed 
by Miss KOIL on his return from three weeks 
aloft to remind Omaha citizens to drive safely 





techniques that tv admeti might avoid 
and seek. 



Like this one on laxatives: 
pw AVOID: Techniques which over- 
n- dramatize the discomfort of one re- 
nt quiring a laxative, which emphasizes 
ial the speed or efficiency of the laxa- 
tive, which duplicate the mechanics 
d of elimination by charts or props. 

SEEK: Techniques which demon- 
strate the pleasant after effects of the 
91 product, and dramatic settings con- 
'(■ nected with places other than the 
3 family hath room. 

Other products in the report receiv- 
•& ing similar "avoid" and "seek" treat- 
s' ment were deodorants, depilatories, 
it toilet tissue, cold and headache reme- 
dies, corn and callous remedies and 
foundation garments. 

o 

Campaigns : 

• General Mills and American 
Machine & Foundry will launch 
this week-end, a major tie-in promo- 
tion for bowling. The campaign, 





built around a Bowling Champions 
jingle contest, will he promoted via 
10 million Wheaties packages, and on 
network tv via a bowling ihow on 
ABC TV, the World Series Pre-Game 
show, the NBC College Football Pre- 
Gaine show, ABC's Saturday night 
Pro-Football show and the CBS pre- 
gaine Pro-Football shows. On net- 
work radio, the tie-in will be on Mu- 
tual's Sportsbeat. 

• Wimda Were franchise deal- 
ers kick-off DuPont's fall advertising 
campaign this week in support of 
carpets made of ]()0 f }< duPont nylon. 
The schedule: June Allyson Show, 
CBS TV and the Today Show on 
NBC TV — to he supplemented at the 
local level via 590 radio and tv spots 
in 127 cities. 

• Oldsinoltile (Brother) this 
week will unveil its 19fi0 models via 
a twin network hilling Tuesday: The 
Dennis O'Keefe Show, 8-8:30, CBS 
TV followed by a 60-minutc Bing 
Crosby special on ABC TV. In addi- 
tion to the tv effort, Oldsmobile will 
sponsor Lowell Thomas in a series of 



uighth newscasts on CBS Radio. 
I See Auto Wrap-l p, this issue, page 
31.1 

• Mar} html Clnb Coffer made 
it> Colorado debut last week over a 
network of seven tv stations. The in- 
troduction took the form of an hour- 
long fashion spectacular featuring tv 
.-tars and new fall creations with all 
proceeds from the show (admission 
at $10 per) donated to the Muscular 
I)) atrophy Association. Agency: Clay 
Stephenson A-sociates, Houston. 

• Warner -Lambert Phariiia- 
cen'ieal Co. will take part, this sea- 
son, in its most extensive network tv 
schedule — adding up to 11 weekly 
network programs and three specials, 
including, for the first time, partici- 
pation in da) time tv via three ABC 
TV shows. 



AGENCIES 



Doyle Dane Iternhaeh lias ac- 
quired its first national food linsi- 



THREE FOR ALL! KDKA (Pittsburgh) per- 
sonalities (l-r) Bob Tracy, Clark Race, Carl 
Ide staged "anything goes" bicycle race. Any- 
thing did! Winner Tracy tossed pies at losers 



THE SKY'S THE LIMIT when KOYN goes 
all out for its radio promotion. Suspended 50 
feet above fair grounds in Billings, Mont., stu- 
dio attracted vast live and listener audience 





SURPRISE! Lecta, one-year-old female circus elephant, pays unexpected visit to WERE, 
Cleveland's morning show as part of station's Adventure Radio promotion, and is rewarded by 
show's host Phil McLean with her favorite breakfast foods — popcorn and candied apples 





SUMMA CUM LAUDE! Janet Elaine Hand, 
voted "Miss-Back-To-School" in WABC N.Y.'s 
contest at Palisades Amusement Park, poses 
with d.j. Martin Block — one of lucky judges 

65 



WREX-TV 



RATES 



TH* 



AMONG THE TOP 
ONE HUNDRED TV MARKETS 

* SOURCE: TELEVISION MAGAZINE 



REX, 

the friendly 
Lion says . . < 




"YOU GET THE LION'S 
SHARE OF RICH 
AGRICULTURAL AND 
INDUSTRIAL MID'AMERICA" 



Shoot Dead Center 
for SALES POWER! 




YES, STRAIGHT SHOOTIN' 
RIGHT INTO 365,000 
HOMES IN THE HEART 
OF MID-AMERICA'S 
AGRICULTURAL AND 
INDUSTRIAL MARKETS 



REPRESENTED BY H-R TELEVISION INC. 
J. M. BAISCH GEN. MGR. 



ncss account this week: 

The Salada Junket division of Sa- 
lada-Sheriff-Horsey, hilling about $2 
million. This includes Salada tea. 
Junket desserts and other food items. 

The account was at SSC&B — now 
the Liptou Tea agency. 

The future of expansion-minded 
small and medium-sized agencies 
is in air media, said Emil Mogul 
at the opening meeting of the 
League of Advertising Agencies 
in Nov York last week. 

Warned Mogul, president of Mogul, 
Williams & Saylor: "Agency man- 
agers with the growth outlook should 
be thinking of future expansion in 
terms of developing an air media op- 
eration. If they fail to see the advan- 
tages of getting their feet wet now, 
they'll not only miss the boat — they'll 
never reach the pier in the first 
place." 

Profile of the American contest- 
ant : 

The contest division of Bruce, 
Richards Corp. released to major 
advertisers and agencies this week the 



results of a national consumer survey 
on the opinions and attitudes of 
the general public towards con- 
tests. 

Among the findings: The majority 
of the women entering contests 
(,35/? ) and men (14.6%) are from 
30 to 50 years of age; 45.6% are in I 
the $5-8,000 a year income bracket; 
41.7/1 of the contestants are house- 
wives and the majority (39.4% ) are I 
from large cities with over 100,000 
population. 



Agency appointments: Reddi- 
Wip, Los Angeles, for its whipped 
cream, billing §1 million, from 
D'Arcy to North Advertising . . 
ABC TV, billing $1.5 million, from 
BBDO to Doyle Dane Bernbach 
. . . The Phoenix of Hartford Insur- 
ance Companies, to the Boston office 
of Kcnyon & Eckhardt . . . Gulton 
Industries. Metuchen, N. J., manufac- 
turers of electronic equipment, for its 
Alkaline Battery Division, to Doner 
& Peck . . . Cedergreen Frozen 
Food Corp. and the Peerless Meat 
Products Co.. to Kraft, Smith & 
Eh rig, Seattle. 




NO, THIS IS "KNOE-LAND" 

(embracing industrial, progressive Worth Louisiana, South Arkansas, 
West Mississippi) 

JUST LOOK AT THIS MARKET DATA 

Population 1,520,100 Drug Sales $ 40,355,000 

Households 423,600 Automotive Sales $ 299,539,000 

Consumer Spendable Income General Merchandise $ 148,789,000 

$1,761,169,000 Total Retail Sales $1,286,255,000 
Food Sales $ 300,486,000 

KNOE-TV AVERAGES 78.5% SHARE OF AUDIENCE 



According to April 1959 ARB we average 78.5% share of audience from Sign On to Sign Off 
7 days a week. During 361 weekly quarter hours it runs 80% to 100%, and for 278 weekly 

quarter hours 92% to 100%. 

CBS • A B C 
A James A. Noe Station 
Channel 8 Represented by 

Monroe, Louisiana H-R Television, Inc. 

Photo: Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Lighting Division Plant, Vicksburg, Mississippi, 
producers of fluorescent and incandescent lighting equipment for commerce and industry. 



KNOE-TV 




66 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



iSSiSi 







i nd their fc 




Our Wisconsin farm gats (and their families) are distinguishable 
today only by their added incomes! Here is truly the bountiful Land 
of Milk and Money, Thousands of big dairy farms . . . scores of cl 
small cities . . . 400,000 families enjoying CBS-ch. 2 television. 
Here's the market to cultivate Sales! 




IRON MT. 

ANTICO } 

^ MENOMINEE^ 

WAUSAU ■JU* R !'j! E y E ■ 

OCONTOI* 



STEVENSJPT. 

J wis. rapids' 



(STURGEON 
BAY 



^appieton ^ 



I 



1 



OSNKOSHJ 

- ■=" * s </ 

FOND DM LAC 



MANITOWOC 



5 

SHEBOYGAN 




WBAY 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



07 



Merger: The Zakin Co. and Irving 
R. Blumenthal. both New York. The 
accounts of the two agencies will be 
handled from Zakin offices at 27 E. 
37th Street. 

Thisa 11* data: Live and video tape 
color tv production techniques were 
demonstrated, this past week, at the 
first fall meeting of the Agency 
Broadcast Producers Workshop, 
Chicago . . . Name change: the In- 
galls-Miniter-IIaughey Co.. Boston, 
to Ingalls Associates . . . New of- 



fices: Jack T. Sharp Advertising, 
to 3101 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland . . . 
Resignation: Ann Smith, as radio/ 
tv director of the Ralph H. Jones Co., 
Cincinnati. 

They were named v.p.'s: Robert 
Aledort, at EWR&R . . . Joseph 
Standart, Jr., and Jerome Dar- 
row, at Y&R . . . Philip Cleland 
and Jerome Roscoe, at C. J. La- 
Roche . . . Jack Barnes, at Wunder. 
man, Ricotta & Kline, New York . . . 
Sid Blumenstock, to v.p. in charge 



of the West Coast office of Charles 
Schlaifer Co., New York agency. 

More personnel notes: Hal 
James, to partner of Robert C. Dur- 
ham Associates, with the principal in- 
terests in the radio/tv consulting area 
. . . Richard Lamhardi, to radio/ 
tv director, Hoag & Provandie, Bos- 
ton . . . Amo Johnson, v.p. and 
senior economist of JWT, to chair- 
man of the board of ARF . . . Philip 
Worcester, to production supervis- 
or on Alcoa tv commercials at 
F&S&R . . . Dan Renberg, to assist- 
ant account executive and marketing 
research specialist for Campbell- 
Mithun, Los Angeles . . . Pieter 
tlcKadt, to senior project director 
in the research department of Ogilvy, 
Benson & Mather. 



FILM 



United Artists was served with an 
anti-trust suit by the Justice 
Dept., which is holding up on its 
major anti-trust actions in the tv 
field, pending final disposition 
by the FCC. 

The U.A. suit charges that acquir- 
ing by the film company of the as- 
sets of Associated Artists and C & C, 
formerly competitors in the field of 
distributing feature films to tv will 
put U.A. into a monopoly position. 

The assets concerned are the pre- 
1949 libraries of Warner Bros, and 
RKO. 

A tv film company will be the 
first in U. S. business history to 
make an overnight shift of its 
offices from one coast to the 
other. 

Portions of NTA's New York of- 
fice were slated for airlifting to the 
West Coast between the close of busi- 
ness on Friday, 25 September, and 
the beginning of office hours on Mon- 
day. 28 September. 

The Los Angeles offices will be in 
the National Theaters and Television 
building. NTA is a subsidiary of 
NT & T. 

Remaining in New York will be 
Telestudios, program sales. NTA Pic- 
tures and the station o&o unit. All 
others will move to Los Angeles. 

(Please turn to page 77) 



Cadillac area people earn more money, 
and — 

WWTV COVERS 

MORE CONSUMER 

INCOME THAN 

YOU'LL FIND IN 

DELAWARE! 




It's true! Consumer income in 36 
Northern Lower Michigan coun- 
ties where WWTV has NCS No. 3 
daily circulation, both daytime and 
nighttime, is higher than for the 
entire state of Delaware*. 

To top it off, no other station 



WKZOTV — GRAND RAPIDS KALAMAZOO 
WKZO RADIO — KALAMAZOO BATTLE CREEK 
WJEF RADIO — GRAND RAPIDS 
WJEF FM — GRAND RAPIDS KALAMAZOO 
WWTV — CADILLAC. MICHIGAN 
KOLN-TV — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 

Aitaciated with 
WMBD RADIO — PEORIA, ILLINOIS 
WMBD TV — PEORIA. ILLINOIS 



NCS No. 3 glvc-i WWTV tfo r hm. wtekly circa. 
Saltan In 16,090 hamai, nighttime- circulation 
In 106.130 hamai In 36 Michigan counties. 



even approaches WWTV's popu- 
larity in the important Cadillac 
market. The latest Pulse survey 
(Nov. 5-12, 1958) gives WWTV 
leadership in 238 of 240 quarter 
hours, Monday through Friday 
(noon-midnight)! 

Add WWTV to your WKZO-TV 
(Kalamazoo-Grand Rapids) sched- 
ule and get all the rest of outstate 
Michigan worth having. If you 
want it all, give us a call! 

*Consnmer Spendable Income in Dela- 
ware is $857.2 million. The WWTV 
area has an income of $905.2 million. 




WWTV 

316,000 WATTS • CHANNEL 13 • 1383' TOWER 
CBS and ABC In CADILLAC 
Serving Northern Lower Michigon 
Avery-Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



68 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



MAN -0 -WAR (FRIGATE) BIRD 

. . . Found Only In South Florida 




By Wallace Hughe; FLORIDA W ILDLIFE Magazine 
Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Communion 



WCKT-TV7, Miami 

...Found Only In 424,000 South Florida TV Homes ! 

For reprints of this painting and for availabilities — N.B.C. Spot Sales 



FAMOUS MEASURING INSTRUMENTS: 2 



The 

standard 
by which 
others 
are judged 






his meter bar, made of an alloy 
of 90% platinum and 10% 
iridium, is the standard 
that governs all metric 
measurements of length in the United 
States. It is Prototype No. 27 of the inter- 
national standards kept at the Inter- 
national Bureau of Weights and Measures, 
at Sevres, in France. 

An accurate copy of the inter- 
national standard, compared with it at 
regular intervals to make sure it is still 
accurate, this meter bar has engraved on 
its surface two parallel lines. The distance 
between them is the primary standard for 
all metric measurements of length. This 
meter bar is kept at the United States Na- 
tional Bureau of Standards, in Washington. 

There are no such precise gauges in 
the measurement of mass audiences in tele- 
vision. This is why such measurement is 
difficult, at best. But American Research 
Bureau, pioneer in the field, is regarded as 
the ultimate in precision (within its own 
rigidly denned limits), offering the most 
precise measurements possible and report- 
ing them to ARB clients with Accuracy . . . 
Reliability . . . and Believability. 



As a measurement of all television viewing 
to all stations (direct, by community an- 
tenna or translator station), ARB's family 
viewing diary is second to none. No other 
data-gathering device approaches its care- 
ful preparation and field testing. But it is 
not diary measurement alone that ensures 
reliability. It is the manner of application, 
with its many safeguards against distor- 
tion, that sets ARB's validity apart. Skilled 
interviewer supervision and the experience 
of many years in handling over 20,000 
family viewing records per month have 
established ARB's diary measurement 
technique as the utmost in . . . 

Accuracy . . . Reliability . . . 
Believability 

AMERICAN 
RESEARCH 
BUREAU, INC. 




WASHINGTON 



NEW YORK 
LOS ANGELES 



CHICAGO 



What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



26 SEPTEMBER 1959 

Cwrlghl 1051 
SPONSOR 
PUBLICATION* INC. 



Robert A. Kicks, the Justice Department's temporary antitrust chief, it's ap- 
parent, has little point of difference with the Harrow Report's recommendations 
for sweeping changes in the tv network industry. 

In fact, Hicks goes further than the FCC's network study group on the matter of option 
time. This after completing his study of the report's recommendations. 

The Bicks influence was largely responsible for branding option time a "per se" 
violation of antitrust laws, a label attached by Judge Hansen before he resigned from the 
job which Bicks holds temporarily, and to which lie may be formally appointed. 

Bicks made no predictions about what the Justice Department will do when the FCC 
finishes its consideration of option time, however. Meanwhile the occasional antitrust suits 
against distributors of feature films to tv are evidences that the Justice Department eye con- 
tinues on the industry. (Sec FILM-SCOPE, page 72, re suits against United Artists.) 



The, FCC's own option time proposal-*, to cut from .'i to 2 \4i hours per broad- 
cast day segment, to count "straddle'' programs entirely within option time, to 
give affiliates greater freedom to reject web programs, passed another slow mile- 
stone: Deadline for filing reply arguments has expired. 

Whole thing boiled down to a statement by KTTV to the effect that the whole argument 
of the networks is that they should be protected from competition. With the networks and 
affiliates responding that KTTV is merely saying that the word of the Attorney Ceneral 
should be taken as law, despite the fact that the Attorney General has himself said 
that bis role is only advisory. 

The networks and affiliates pointed out that no filings were made in favor of the FCC 
proposal to cut option time by one-half hour, and only K'lTV opposed the practice entirely. 

They said the KTTV position was counter to the FCC's findings that the practice is nec- 
essary to survival of networks. 

The networks and affiliates were just as much opposed to the alternate ideas advanced 
by Westinghouse, the station reps, and NTA. 

Sen. Mike Monroney (D., Okla.), long-time opponent of ratings services and 
tv programing on the powerful Senate Commerce Committee, bus now lost his 
patience with FCC tardiness in getting at least three tv stations on the air in most 
of She nation's top 100 markets. 

He told the Senate, just before adjournment, that the Commission has wasted five years, 
and that perhaps a fire should be lighted under the commissioners. 



The antitrust suit brought by the Justice Department against NBC in connec- 
tion with Philadelphia stations WRCV-TV and WKCV Radio was disposed of this 
week by the network agreeing to a consent decree. 

Under the consent decree NI5C. agreed to: 

1) Dispose of these two stations, obtained in a swap with Wcstinglioiisc, which the 
latter charged was coerced. 

2) Not to buy any interest in any other Philadelphia tv station for 10 years 
or Philadelphia radio station for five years. 

3) Not acquire an)' substantial interest in an) tv station in any of the seven major mar- 
kets, not counting Philadelphia, without giving the Justice Department an opportunity 
to ask the court whether coercion or restraint of trade was involved. 



Sjl'ONSOt! • 2(> SliPTEMIJER 1959 



71 



Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



26 SEPTEMBER 1959 

Ctojrlght 1959 
8P0N80R 
PUBLICATIONS INC 



Blue Plate Foods' next syndicated show in its 39 southern markets will he 
MCA's Shotgun Slade starting in November. 

The food sponsor signed for alternate week sponsorship through Fitzgerald Advertising, 
of New Orleans. 

Other new buyers of the show are: Busch Bavarian, Schlitz, Armour, Sun Oil and Con- 
sumer's Co-op. 



It may well he that video-tape rather than film is the tactic that will carry addi- 
tional Hollywood majors into the tv fold. 

Paramount Television Productions has named Stretch Adler as director of network sales. 
Note that Paramount already has one tape pilot and intends to have others. 
Keep in mind also that Paramoinil's KTLA, Los Angeles, has a program department of 
evident national rather than local proportions. 



Six of the seven new film scries to be carried on the Canadian network this 
season are U. S. productions. 

All of the shows will be seen in Canada before they're seen in the U. S. 

The shows are: MCA's Riverboat, Staccato and The Deputy, Screen Gems' Man From 
Blackhawk and Dennis the Menace and ITC's The Four Just Men. 

The CBC s policy of getting shows on the air first north of the border will also apply 
to such returning series as Father Knows Best, Lassie, Danny Thomas, Twentieth Century and 
Walt Disney Presents. 



There's been a dramatic rise this season in the importance of rc-runs in the 
economics of tv film distribution. 

For one thing, eight out of 21 shows currently reporting sales are re-runs; nine are 
new shows, two are renewals and one is a revival. 

Two distributors — CBS Films and ABC Films — are selling re-runs now without any new 
properties to balance out their portfolio, and furthermore, other distributors such as ITC are 
bearing down heavily on re-run income. 

Although re-run prices rarely come up to first-run levels, one tally shows 625 re-run 
deals compared to 866 first-run sales. 

Compare the sales progress of re-run and first-run shows below: 



RE-RUNS (OFF NETWORK) MARKETS SOLD 

Jim Bowie (ABC Films) 72 

Meet McGraw (ABC Films) 21 

Phil Silvers (CBS Films) 90 

Trackdown (CBS Films) -60 

Californians (CNP-VPS) 15 

Jeff's Collie (ITC) 167 

Brave Stallion (ITC) 102 

Sgt. Preston (ITC) 95 



NEW FIRST-RUNS 

Not For Hire (CNP) 
Johnny Midnight (MCA) 
Shotgun Slade (MCA) 
Coronado 9 (MCA) 
Four Just Men (ITC) 
Grand Jury (NT A) 
Manhunt (Screen Gems) 
This Man Dawson (Ziv) 



MARKETS SOLD 

74 
26 
140 
65 
101 
51 
116 
103 
189 



Lock-Up (Ziv) 

Note: The only renewals reporting current business are NTA's U. S. Marshal and Screen 
Gems' Rescue 8. 



12 



SPONSOR • 20 SEITKMUEK 1959 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



The syndication operation of United Vrtifls Tv has to date sold the Tides ol the 
Vikings in 53 markets with the gross figuring around 8750, 000. 

The regional sales include Laclede Gas (D'Arry), 1XL Foods in the northwest (Comp- 
ton) and the Royal Castle Hamburger chains in the southeast. 

Almost 20 markets were bought by Tv, Inc., a station buying group. 

CBS TV Films has recruited a v.p., Robert Lewine, from NBC TV's program 
hierarchy to take over the post left vacant hy I. en Harris" 1 exit, v.p, in charge of 
program development, 

Lewinc's title at NBC was v.p., tv network programs. He came over from ABC TV with 
Robert Kintner about three years ago. 

The NAB's tv code affairs department has set up an office in Hollywood to ad- 
vise film producers. 

The new office will cover code matters on an estimated 40% of programing seen on the 
air. (That percentage is the share Hollywood producers ha\c of air time.) 

However, syndication producers and shows won't be too much affected by ihe presence 
of ibis NAB office. 

The reason: Syndicated shows are largely self-censoring since they must prove 
acceptable to a great range of buyers, many of whom aren't known in advance of scripting 
and filming. 

NT A has sigued a letter of intent with a Soviet film export agency providing 
for an exchange of television programs and motion pictures. 

It's expected that six feature films will be exchanged with the Russians in the next 12 
months, and that NTA will receive cartoons and other films. 

Since five native languages are involved in Soviet film production, their producers have 
heavy dubbing experience and will handle all dubbing processes on the exchange. 

No financial details were disclosed. 



r— — ■— — ~ * — : 

COMMERCIALS 

A milestone in agency-prodneer negotiations on the production of video-tape 
commercials is Leo Burnett's standard provisions contract — the industry's first — 
signed with Telestudios. 

The contract takes the video-tape producer out of the facilities business and makes him 
a "total package" producer much like his film counterpart. 

Under this contract, the producer supplies everything from start to finish once the agency 
completes script, storyboard and specifications. 

One implication is that agency film men will now be able to handle tape commercials 
with ease; formerly only men with "live" experience could handle video-tape commercials 
when they were figured on a costs-plus facilities basis. 

Some 25 areas covered in the new contract — which might be widely copied — include qual- 
ity, approvals, changes, delivery, performer's production and use fees, union codes, rights and 
publicity. 

(For details, see story this issue, page 35.) 

Robert Lawrence is running a couiesl in Canada to pick !\Iiss TV Commercial 
of 1959. 

The contest is to stress the availability of lalent in Canada and to mark the open- 
ing of Lawrence's new studios this October. 



sroNSOK • 20 5KH KJUUKR 1959 



73 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



26 SEPTEMBER 1959 BBDO is in process of weeding out smaller, unprofitable accounts. 

cwniiiit i»m It wants to get rid of those that demand a lot of marketing services but feel they're 

sponsor being imposed upon when the question of billing eomes up. 



PUBLICATIONS 1N0 



A tv executive for an agency heavy in specials told a freelance producer that one 
of the clients was getting uneasy about the fees paid him. 

Retorted the produeer: "But your client must remember I'm a genius." 



Perhaps it's due to the paee of the tv medium, hut the term of survival in program- 
ing and sales at the networks now is down to about five years. 

In faet, some who have been around three vcars consider themselves veterans. 



Y&K's Pete Matthews describes as "whimsical" the report that the ageney's 
Chicago office lias to "clear time buys with the media department at headquarters." 
The Chieago organization operates with full autonomy on this front. 

What strongly favored Doyle Dane Bernbaeh as ABC TV's choice as new agency 
was the faet that it was able to put a task force to work on the account immediately. 

Other bidders admitted they couldn't promise what people eould be sprung loose 
to get the network's eopy and serviee needs in the mill. 

Bob Swczcy, who just retired from WDSU-TV-AM, New Orleans, is reported beaded 
for a top executive post with the NAB. 

He would step in as No. 2 man and take over the top spot when Hal Fellows decides 
to retire. 

Another report has him moving in as the executive director of the Tv Infor- 
mation Office. 

The angle that "I can get it for you at the retail rate" often is being used by 
agencies pitching for accounts heavy in the spot' media. 

A reeent ease in point is a national bread account whieh took the bait, and for the 
first time in 20 years is getting the retail rate by letting the new agency buy time 
through distributors. 

The exit of the CBS TV account from McCaiin-Krickson is an illuminating exam, 
pie of what happens when the top men in agency-client relations drift apart as the 
result of accumulating responsibilities and interests. 

Time was when Frank Stanton and Marion Harper, Jr., met frequently for 
lunch. About the only time there's been any recent eontaet: a quick handshake at some 
VIP reception outside the business. 

As often happens in sueh eases, the influence factor is diluted, and people in the 
lower echelons can topple things over. 

/4 SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 




Big, new 50,000-watt KRLA Radio booms 
a big, new sound — Modern Radio Los 
Angeles — into America's fastest-moving 
market. It's new, it's power packed and 
it's smack at 1110, dead center on the dial. 
New, million- dollar selling personalities! 
New audience impact! New million -dollar 
coverage throughout Southern California 
—99 99/100% perfect! KRLA is a must-buy 
in Los Angeles radio. And the availabili- 
ties are prime. Your future is right now 
on KRLA . . . Modern Radio Los Angeles. 




For a franchise in prime time, at lowest 
cost, on a 50,000-watt leader in the nation's 
number-one radio market, buy now! 

MODERN RADIO I LOS ANGELES 

KRLA 

I DIAL 1 1 10 I 50,000 WATTS 

6381 Hollywood Boulevard., Los Angeles 28, Hollywood 2-7388 
Ed Schulz, General Manager 

Represented Nationally by Donald Cooke Inc. 
New York, Chicago, San Francisco. Jack Heatherlngton, St. Louis 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



75 





How many puffs in a station break- 

or when does sales resistance become resentment ? 



Be sure to shoot in COLOR . 
You'll be glad you did 



Here's another place where film comes into the picture 
. . . because pre-testing is easy with commercials on film— 
lets you test to your heart's content before you show them. 
Important, too — film gives you full control of time and 
station . . . keeps you in the driver's seat all the way. 

Use black-and-white — or color . . . there's an Eastman 
Film for every purpose. 

For complete information write to: 

Motion Picture Film Department 
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY. Rochester 4. N. Y. 




WRAP-UP 

{Continued from page C8) 

Sales: Zi\ reports it s going into the 
1959-60 season with at least 37 na- 
tional and regional advertiser:- who 
have used Ziv product six )ears or 
more . . . NTA's Grand Jury reached 
$1 million sales mark with sales to 
Savarin Coffee on WCBS-TV, New 
York; 0"Keefe Brewing in Buffalo 
and Watertown; Society National 
Bank on WJW-TV, Cleveland; Schlitz 
on WNBQ, Chicago, as well as to 
D-X Sunra) for 32 midwest markets; 
I other sales are to NBC o&o's WKC- 
TV, Washington; WRCV-TV, Phila- 
! delphia. and KRCA-TV, Los Angeles; 
to Crosley stations WLW-T, Cincin- 
nati; WLW-C, Columbus; WLW-A, 
Atlanta; WLW-D, Da) ton. and WLW- 
1. Indianapolis; station sales on 
Grand Jury were also to KOA-TV, 
Denver; WRCB-TV. Schenectady; 
WCKT, Miami, and WKRG-TV, Mo- 
bile; other advertiser sales were 
made in Tampa and Fresno. 

More sales: CN'P's Danger Is My 
Business to WBRE-TV, Wilkes-Barre; 
WHDH-TV. Boston; WJ TV, Jackson; 
WSFN-TV. St. Petersburg; K0L0- 
TV, Reno, and WWL-TV. New Or- 
leans, and Union Pacific to WCAL- 
TV, Lancaster; WABC-TV, Green- 
wood: WRVA-TV, Richmond, and 
WLOF-TV. Orlando. 



Video-tape: The West Coast's first 
independent video-tape production 
company in full scale production is 
National Videotape Service of 
1000 N. Cahuenga Blvd. with com- 
plete interior and remote facilities. 
Two Ampex recorders are now in 
operation and three more will be 
added, providing both commercials 
and programs production services. 

Production: Ziv will spend S21 
million on program production this 
)ear for eight syndicated and four 
network shows, compared to $16.5 
million last year for six syndicated 
and two network series . . . Among 
11 tv film pilots being prepared by 
Philip D. Krasne are now also Man 
of the House, Gentleman Joe and 
Trinity 4-3000; they are a situation 
corned), a western and an action 
melodrama, respectively . . . Another 
Krasne pilot slated for Japanese pro- 



duction will be The Searchers . . . 
Screen Gems" The Uan From Black- 
httick Mopped production for one 
week to allow star Bob Rockwell to 
address National Association of In- 
,-nianee Agents, contention in Chi- 
cago; he play? insurance investigator 
in show . . . Mrs. Franklin Delano 
Roosevelt will moderate Flamingo's 
Thinking Things Through, a tape and 
film panel series in which foreign 
and American stndenls exchange 
view s. 

"Sneak" previews: Bernard L. 
Schubert plans to "sneak"' preview 
all of its forthcoming tv film series in 
six cities, with as many as six epi- 
sodes of each series to get the treat- 
ment. 

Office moves: Midwestern office of 
Trans-Lu.v moves to 520 North 
Michigan Avenue in Chicago . . . 
Bernard L. Schubert opens a Ca- 
nadian office at 2 Carlton Street, 
Toronto. 

Option time: NTA has asked to be 
heard by the FCC regarding the sug- 
gestion of making a half-hour of op- 
tion time open dail) to an independ- 
ent program supplier. 

Strictly personnel: Barbara Lane 

appointed production supervisor of 
Robert Lawrence Productions . . . 
Elizabeth Bain joins L A A as ex- 
ecutive director of participating agree, 
ments w ith stations. 



NETWORKS 



Tobacco advertisers spent $44,- 
116.665 in network tv during 
the first seven months of 59 — a 
31% increase over the like pe- 
riod of "58. 

As tabulated by TvB. smoking 
materials is now the third leading 
classification in network tv. surpassed 
only by food and food product* and 
toiletries. 

The six-months' gross figures of 
leading advertisers in this classifica- 
tion: R. J. Reynolds, S9.386.398; P. 
Lorillard. S8.096.559: Liggett & 
Mvers, $7,201,059: \merican Tobac- 
co. $6,908,025: Broun & Williamson, 
$1,539,021: Philip Morris, $3,907.- 
096: and Bayuk Cigars. $3,662,496. 



1 1 



East Coast Division 
342 Madison Avenue, Now York 17, N.Y. 

Micfwost Division 
130 East Randolph Drive, Chicago 1, III. 

West Coast Division 
6706 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood 38, Calif. 



W. J. GERMAN, Inc. 

Agents for the sale and distribution of 
Eastman Professional Motion Picture Films, 
Fori Lee, N.J.; Chicago, III.; Hollywood, Calif. 



Debuting dates: Red Skelton be- 
gins his seventh )ear on CBS TV, for 
S. C. Johnson (FC&B) and Pet Milk 
(Gardner) 29 September . . . The 
hour \ersion of The Lineup airs 30 
September on CBS TV . . . Dick 
Powell'? Zane Grey Theatre, its fourth 
season on CBS TV 1 October . . . 
Perry Mason, its third season on 
CBS TV 3 October . . . Lunch With 
Soupy Sales debuts on ABC TV 3 
October. 12-12:30 p.m. for Jell-0 
l^&PO . . . Jack Benny returns to 
CBS TV in a new time period Sun- 
day. 4 October. 10-10:30 p.m. for 



Lever (JWT) . . . Danny Thomas, 
third >ear on CBS TV for General 
Foods' (B&B) 5 October . . . Ozzie & 
Harriet, eighth season on ABC TV. 
7 October . . . Broken Arrow returns 
to ABC TV 11 October for Mars 
(Knox Reeves) . . . The Untouch- 
ables, new hour-long series on ABC 
TV debuts Thursday, 15 October. 

(For a complete rundown of the 
fall network tv schedule, see Tv 
Basics, this issue, page 43.) 

Another instance of AB-PT ex- 
it a ii (ling interna' ional ward : it's 



Beam your sales message to 



DULUTH- 
SUPERIOR 



the 





LARGEST 
MARKET 

in both Minnesota and 
Wisconsin 



Zooming sales have made the Twin 
Ports metropolitan area the 2nd 
largest marltet in size only to the 
Twin Cities in Minnesota and Mil- 
waukee in Wisconsin. 

In WDSM-TV's coverage area live 
800,000 people, spending over I bil- 
lion dollars* annually. 

You can best sell, best adver- 
tise to this growing industrial, 
shipping and vacation center 
by using WDSM-TV . . . 

•SRDS 5/10/59 





AT THE HEAD OF THE SEAWAY 

a WDSM-TV 

DULUTH, MINN. NBC SUPERIOR, WISC. 



purchased minority interest in Tv de 
Costa Rica, San Josa. Scheduled to 
air. in December, the new Channel 7 
will be Costa Rica's first tv station. 

Thisa 'n' data: Ryder Cup com- 
petition between professional golfers 
of the U.S. and Great Britain will be 
televised for the first time Saturday, 
7 November, on NBC TV for Val- 
iant (BBDO), Chrysler's new econo- 
my car . . . Broadcast Music, Inc., 
has acquired and will retain the BMI 
stock formerly owned by NBC, for 
821,320. 

Strictly personnel: Charles 
Ayres, v. p. for the eastern division, 
tv network sales; Omar Elder, Jr., 
v.p. and general counsel for the tv 
network and Daniel Melnick, v.p. 
in charge of program development, 
all ABC TV . . . Alex Kennedy, to 
the newly-created post of director of 
audience promotion for CBS TV . . . 
Clifford Slaybaugh, to manager, 
associated companies, NBC Interna- 
tional Operations . . . Richard Heff- 
ner, director of information pro- 

{Please turn to page 81) 



PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC. 
EXCLUSIVE NATL REPS. 



WAYNE EVANS & ASSOC. 
REGIONAL REPS. 



CHECK /and 
DOUBLE CHECK 




V 

WTHI-TV offers the 
lowest cost per thousand 
of all Indiana TV 
stations! 

One hundred and eleven 
national and regional 
spot advertisers know that 
the Terre Haute market is 
not covered effectively 
by outside TV. 

WTHI-TV 

HANNEL IO • CBS — ABC 

TERRE 
HAUTE 

INDIANA 

Represented Nationally 
by Boiling Co. 



78 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 







The WeeReBeL discusses "safes campaign ribbons" with Bert Mulligan^ Broadcast Supervisor, 

Compton Advertising , New York. 

Hone you heard what the Ul R B L 
said to [amptan Hduertising? 

We're rich in Columbus'.' 

Average family income in the metropolitan trading area of Columbus, Georgia, is 
higher than that of New York, Chicago or Detroit. In fact, only 21 other cities in 
the U. S. beat it! 

Over 85% of these hetter-than-average families own TV sets and \VRBL-T\ is 
the only VI1K in the market. VRBL Radio is Columbus* CHS Affiliate with imagi- 
native adult programming . . . high fidelity sound, plus stereo! Call 1I()LL1NGBLR\ 
and let VeeReBeL in Columbus start building business for you. 



WRBL 

TV-CHANNEL 4 • RAD10-5000 WATTS 

a coLumBKJs, en.® 

Represented by George P. Hollingbery Co. 



■3* 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



70 




Television is virtually all things to most 
Americans— teacher for the intellectu- 
ally curious, boon for the spectator 
sportsman, nirvana for the shut-in, whipping 
boy for the snide, frigate for the vicarious 
traveller. It's a love-story in the early after- 
noon, a nursery in the late, a news bulletin 
anytime. It's a walk in the park, forum for 
the thoughtful and microscope slide for politi- 
cal candidates. It's an empathetic counsellor, 
a weather report, a shot in the dark and a 
trek across hostile Indian country. It's jazz at 
the Philharmonic and a Verdi opera. 



And yes, to some, unfortunately, it can 
be too many spots back-to-back, or a quiz 
show with omniscient contestants; to others, 
a tired old Class B movie in place of crea- 
tive local programming and public service. 

To us, television is a medium with 
endless vistas and inherent responsibilities. 
We try to meet those responsibilities whole- 
heartedly and with imagination. Our audi- 
ences—and the number and calibre of our 
clients — give us reason to believe we are 
achieving that goal. 



Responsibility in Broadcasting 



80 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



® 



KHOU-TV 

Houston ( cbs-tv Spo/ Sales) 

KOTV 

Tulsa f/Vfrvj 

KXTV 

Sacramento (H-R) 

WANE-TV 

Fort Wayne ( Petty) 

WISH-TV 

Indianapolis (Boiling) 

WANE-AM 

Fort W\yne (Petry) 

WISH-AM 

lNDtANAPOLtS (Petry) 



WRAP-UP 

{Continual from page To I 

pram service? for the CBS-owned ra- 
dio stations. 



RADIO STATIONS 



The National Association of Kin 
Broadcasters closed the meeting 
in Chicago by putting the wheels 
in motion to establish fin as ;i 
major advertising medium. 

According to Fred Rnhcll, of San 
Diego, (newly-elected president of 
the WKAlBl: "If Americans con- 
tinue to increase listening to fin ra- 
dio and buying fm sets at the rate 
the\ have been in the last two \ears. 
fm radio will surpass am within 
se\ en years. " 

Other new officer* of NAFMB: 
v.j).. T. Mitchell Hastings, Jr., of 
Boston: secretary. Frank Knurr* 
Jr., Tampa: and treasurer. William 
Toniberlin, of Los Angeles. 

( See '"Newsmaker of the Week.'' 
page 0. for more on the convention.) 

Radio station and agency copy- 
writers were given by the HAB a 
12-poinS guide to effective radio 
eommcrcial copy. 

The booklet states that there is no 
''set formula" for writing copy, but 
lists several guides. 

An example: ''Translate selling 
points into advantages. Use attention- 
arresters such as slogans, catch-phra- 
ses, or musical themes that become 
identified with the advertiser." 

Meeting note: For the eighth year, 
WSM, Nashville, on 13-14 November 
will hold its annual country music 
d.j. convention. Registration ex- 
pected to hit 20.000. 

Change: Robert Swezey has resigned 
as executive v.p. and general manager 
of WDSU Broadcasting Corp.. New 
Orleans. "Moving np to that position: 
A. Louis Read, formerly v.p. and 
commercial manager. 

Ideas at work: 

• Anyone for lunch: WMCA, 

New York, marked the debut of Don 
Davis, news and music featurist, by 
gifting press and others w ith a metal 
lunch hox containing champagne and 
a caviar sandwich and this note: 
"Have lunch on me— last of the hig 
time spenders. ' 



• Promoting friendship: Dur- 
ing the second annual Pacific Festival 
this past week. Parke. Davis & Co. 
gifted the rit\ of Osaka. Japan With 
50. 000 capsules of Chloroni)cetin for 
patients in charity ho.-pitals there. 
Donation was inspired by K^A. J»an 
Francisco at station s benefit show in 
the Fox Theater, and represented 100 
capsules for every person attending 
this l\N \ ' Youth Festival." 

News from the fm front: Three 
Transcontinental fin station.* 
WCK-FM. Buffalo: \\ KOC-FM. 
Rochester and KFMB-FM, San Di- 
ego began operations last week, 
with the former two affiliated with 
the QXB Network and the latter op- 
erating as an independent with the 
format built around the great jazz 
field . . . LJiitlSlial sale: The Chi- 
cago Sun-Times and the Chicago 
Daily Xcirs (out of 15151)0) have pur- 
chased a monthly Shakespeare play 
series over WFMT. Chicago — and 
plan using no commercial announce- 
ments on it but presenting the pro- 
grams as a public sen-ice for institu- 
tional promotion . . . New sales or- 
ganization: Western Fm Broad- 
casting, to represent seven Los An- 
iieles fm stations in sales promotion, 

Tbtsa 'n* data: Ground breaking 
ceremonies took place last week in 
Cloquet. Minn, for WKLK's new 
building, slated for late October oc- 
cupanc\ . . . Maola Dairies of North 
Carolina (Harry Gianaris & Associ- 
ates) copped first award for radio 
commercials in Milk Industry Foun- 
dation's national advertising compe- 
tition . . . The Fifth Third Union 
Trust Co.. Cincinnati, completing its 
21 consecutive \eavs as an advertiser 
on WKRC. Cincinnati . . . W'MCA. 
New York, and Sachs Furniture 
Stores, celebrating their 35 years of 
continuous association 2 October. 

Station staffers: Cal IVrley. exec- 
utive general manager and Warren 
Ward, new station manager at 
KSON. San Diego . . . James Wy- 
ehor, to station manager. \VTRl T . 
Muskegon. Mich. . . . Vic Sinian. 
director of sales and Lou Miller, di- 
rector of sales promotion at KMGM. 
Albuquerque. N.M. . . . Tom Thorn- 
ton, to national sales coordinator 
and Jim McGovern. program 
promotion and merchandising man- 
ager for K\X and the CBS Badio 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



i!l 



Pacific Network . . . Donald Pow- 
ers, local sales manager, WCSH, 
Portland, Me. . . . Dan Miller, local 
sales manager, KCOP, Los Angeles 
. . . Picrrina Rolule, director of 
sales promotion, WTAG, Worcester, 
Mass. . . . Carl Hallberg, to radio 
operations coordinator, WDBO, Or- 
lando, Fla. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



The John E. Pearson Companies 
went through further reorgani- 



zation alignments this «eek. 

Centering in the Chicago and At- 
lanta offices, the changes include: 
Robert Flanigan, promoted to Mid- 
west manager in Chicago; Stewart 
Lewis, to Chicago sales executive; 
and Jon Farmer, to head the Atlanta 
office. 

The Katz Agency is circulating 
George Skinner's new manual: 
The Nuts and Bolts of Radio. 

The book, written by the Katz di- 
rector of radio programing services, 
covers all areas of station program- 



. . . and 



WOC -TV 



FOR BEST 
COVERAGE 
IN THE 

NATION'S 47th 
TV MARKET 

(Davenport, Iowa — Rock Island — Moline, Illinois) 

The Largest Market between Chicago and 
Omaha . . . Minneapolis and St. Louis . . . 
the 47th TV market in the nation. 




Population 
1958 1959 



Effective Buying Income* 
1958 1959 



1,599,500 



1,632,100 



Increase — 32,600 



$2,668,806,000 

$2,879,387,000 
Increase — $210,551,000 



TV Homes 



Retail Sales* 



422,800 

Increase — 15,680 



438,480 



$1,918,167,000 

$2,042,037,000 
Increase — $123,870,000 



'Sales Management's "Survey af Buying Power — 1959" 



Col. B. J Palm 

President 

Ernest C. Sanders 

Resident Manager 

Pax Shaffer 

Sales Manager 




DAVENPORT 
BFTTFNDORF 



ROCK ISLAND 
MOLINE 
EAST MOLINF 



WOC-TV is No. 1 in the 
nation's 47th TV market — lead- 
ing in TV homes (438,480), 
monthly coverage and weekly 
circulation — day and night — 
as reported in the Nielson 
Coverage Service No. 3, Spring, 
1958. For further facts and lat- 
est availabilities, call your PGW 
Colonel . . . NOW! 




WOC-TV Davenport, Iowa is part of Central 
Broadcasting Co., which alsa awns and operates 
'•"HO-TV and WHO Radio, Des Moines, Iowa 



ing, including news, editorializing, 
farm and religious programing, pro- 
motion, production, public service, 
station identification and program 
department administration, equipment 
and music. 

Its purpose, as stated by Skinner 
in tbe manual's introduction: "to de- 
scribe the nuts and bolts of radio pro- 
graming and to recommend the cur- 
rently acceptable way of assembling 
them into an effective broadcast pat- 
tern." 



The totality of radio dominating 
the local market is what counts 
for the local advertiser, stated 
Lud Richards. 

The director of radio sales devel- 
opment of PGW, speaking before the 
Raleigh Food Brokers (guests of 
WPTF there), claimed that radio sta- 
tions are capitalizing on the very 
personal type of communication 
they've -developed with listeners in 
the area. 



Rep appointments: To Devney, 
Inc., KGHL-TV, Billings, Mont. . . . 
To Good Music Broadcasters, 
KCMK, Kansas City ... To Everett- 
McKinney, WLAM, Lewiston, Me., 
with Kettell-Carter appointed New 
England sales rep. ... To Walker- 
Rawalt Co., WKXL, Concord, N. H. 
... To Hil F. Best Co., KDOM, 
Windom, Minn.; KOKO, Warrens- 
burg, Mo.; KLPW, Union, Mo.; 
KYRO, Patosi, Mo., and KVLG, La 
Grange, Tex. ... To Broadcast 
Time Sales, WKYW, Louisville . . . 
To Devney, Inc., the U. S. rep for 
CJME, Regina, Sask. ... To B-N-B, 
Inc. Time Sales, the Los Angeles 

rep for KNGS, Hanford, Cal To 

Richard O'Connell, KGBT, Har- 
.lingen, Tex. 

Rep appointments — personnel : 
John Logan, to Detroit sales man- 
ager for CBS Tv Spot Sales . . . 
George Preston, to the Detroit ex- 
ecutive offices of Hil F. Best Co. . . . 
Don Shauer, account executive in 
the San Francisco office of Adam 
Young . . . George Swearinger, ac- 
count executive in the Atlanta office 
of CBS Tv Spot Sales. 

Add to personnel appointments: 
John Coy, to west coast manager of 



112 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



Jh 



e 



Confidi 



ence 



rador 



in 



radio 



New Pulse studies show 
McClatchy stations KM J and KFBK 
lead in acceptance 

New Pulse qualitative studies in Sacramento and 
Fresno, California show the McClatchy stations, 
KFBK and KMJ, suhstantially ahead in puhlic con- 
fidence and acceptance. 

Briefly, respondents were asked which radio 
station: 

1. gave most complete and accurate news 

2. gave the greatest feeling of confidence in 

advertised products 

3. gave the best programming variety 

In each case, KFBK and KMJ ran substantially 
ahead of competition. In fact, in every instance, they 
topped the next two stations combined in listener 
favor. 

Get what you want in your radio buy — listener 
confidence, ratings, coverage and economy — from 
KFBK and KMJ. Any Raymer man can give you 
details. 



$5; j McClatchy Broadcasting Company 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 
PAUL H. RAYMER CO., NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



SrOi\SOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1959 



83 



This Solid, Seasoned, Sales- 
minded, Station Executive is on 
Target 

• This well-known man has an ex- 
tensive background in radio and 
television sales, administration 
and management 

• Eleven years with a major net- 
work in a demanding executive 
capacity 

• Seasoned in sales management, 
station representation, and sta- 
tion management — a man 
thoroughly familiar with the 
broadcast industry. Presently in 
New York. 

Write P.O. Box 17 




They're all tops... 




...in POPS! 

(CCA PROOFS OF 
PURCHASE) 



The Boiling Co E. A. W. Smith 

to manage the Detroit office and Rob- 
ert Richer, to the New York sales 
staff of Adam Young . . . William 
Bee, to tv account executive in New 
York, Edward Petry . . . S. William 
Aronson, account executive. The 
Meeker Co. 

To the tv sales staff of The Katz 
Agency: Robert Lefko, in New York, 
Justin Cassidy and Charles Linton, in 
Chicago and Layton Miller, in Dallas 
... To the Katz radio sales staff: 
Lewis Greist. in New York, Fred Dela- 
hay in Los Angeles and William Fal- 
lon. Chicago. 



TV STATIONS 



"Retailing; is the most expanding 
area in tv today" noted Howard 
Abrahams, v. p.- retail sales at 
TvB, in the preface of a new TvB 
selling brochure for member sta- 
tions. 

Abrahams emphasized that lack of 
understanding is the major obstacle 
to retailers using tv. 

"This new presentation.'' the fore- 
word continued, "is aimed at show- 
ing how some retailers have used tv 
so that their results can be used to 
the benefit of others." 



Ideas at work: 

• Guessing game for timebuy- 

ers: The date WHYZ-TV, the new 
Duluth station, expects to go on the 
air has been made the subject of a 
national contest for timebuyers. What 
they must guess: date, hour, minute 
and second the station will first hit 
the airwaves with its test pattern. 
Prize: Vacations to Bermuda, Las 
Vegas and Florida. 

• Pulling power: Five months 
saturation publicity and promotion 
on WECT-TV, Wilmington, N. C, 
turned out an estimated 70,000 spec- 
tators to the two-day aviation exhibi- 
tion and air show there. Co-sponsored 
by the Civic Air Patrol and the sta- 
tion, the program included displays of 
aircraft and equipment worth over 
$100 million plus daredevil air shows. 

. To the fair: WWLP-WRLP 
moved its mobile camera unit to the 
Eastern States Exposition grounds in 
West Springfield last week to bring 
fair. Stations also taped crowds visit- 



ing the live telecasts of the region's 
largest fair, and played it back on the 
tv -screens that evening. 

• Its a hit: To help the Salem 
Rebels, a farm ball team, have a 
successful season, WSLS-TV and 
WDBJ-TV, both Roanoke, staged a 
baseball game in their stadium, at- 
tracting a record-breaking crowd. 
The game between the personalities 
of each station was heavily promoted 
by on-the-air spots. 

Thisa 'u' data: One result of a 
meeting of the Storz Stations' man- 
agers in Chicago last week was the 
decision to establish a scholarship 
fund in each of their cities . . . 
KIVA-TV, Yuma-El Centro has com- 
pleted its new studio production fa- 
cilities . . . WCAU-TV, Philadelphia, 
will air a weekday a.m. Tv Seminar, 
good for college credit . . . WPRO- 
TV, Providence, R. L, will award 
$1,000 for the best tv play script by 
a New England author . . . For the 
first time in its history, the Washing- 
ton Dairy Products Commission will 
sponsor tv programs via two half- 
hours on KOMO-TV, Seattle. 

Kudos: To Tom Franklin, Shell 
news reporter on KGO-TV, San Fran- 
cisco, the 1959 California State Fair 
Gold Medal ... To WCAU-TV, 
Philadelphia, the Communications. 
Media award from the Philadelphia 
Association for the Blind for its Re~ 
turn series. 

On the personnel front: Amos 
Baron, to director of tv sales for 
the Broadcast Division of NAFI 
Corp. . . . Terry Lee, to managing 
director of WAGA-TV, Atlanta . . . 
Joseph Evans, Jr., managing di- 
rector of W1T1-TV, Milwaukee . . . 
Francis Hunt, to operations man- 
ager, KTV1, St. Louis . . . Arthur 
Watson, business manager, WRCV- 
TV, Philadelphia . . . Dunbar 
Eherts, Lon Rossillo and Mort 
Katock, to sales executives of Trand 
Associates, a tv/radio packaging firm 
. . . Donald Boyee, station man- 
ager and Edward Zellefrow, tech- 
nical manager, WSEE-TV, Erie . . . 
Tom Leahy, to promotion manager, 
KTVH, Wichita-Hutchinson . . . Jack 
Williams, to promotion and mer- 
chandising director for WSAZ-TV, 
Huntington, W. Va. ^ 



84 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



- 

r 



OUlahomans are sold on 



City X^BC Channel * 
f Te evision System Inc. 

The V/M iC Oklahoma City 
V/KY Radio, burg> Fla. 

WTVT, T^f^gomery, Ala. 
WSFA-TV'Mortg Agency 

Represented by ti 



m ministers time kj 

ts _ 



TOPEKA AREA & 
Central Kansas 
Gathers Bumper 
Wheatjiarvest 

3rd Year of Excellent Crops 
Boosts Bank Depos.t to 
New Record Heights 

TOPEKA^CSpecial) -- 
Prosperity extends through- 
out all Central Kansas and 
the Topeka area 
.or.rpcord wheat cr^JBP' 



iatii 

f- 
it 

• g' 
to 



'J 



TOPEKA 

Has 1 TV Station 

WIBW-TV 

Is It! 



All Day- Every Day 

Survey- Proved 

WIBW-TV 

Tops Competition 

. . . serving a total of 
38 Kansas Counties 

As A Bonus 

Wl B W-TV 
Is The ONLY 
TV Station Available 
to 100,000 
WHEAT-RICH 
TV HOMES 
in Central Kansas 



WIBW-TV 

CBS • NBC • ABC 
Channel 13 

TOPEKA, KANSAS 

(Division Stouffer-Copper Publications) 
Represented by Avery-Knodef, fnc. 



86 





Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 



Lawrence W. Kliewer has been elected 
v.p. of operations at the Peninsula Broad- 
casting Co., Hampton, Va. Kliewer joined 
the staff of Peninsula as an announcer 
while he was attending William and Mary 
College. A short time later, he rose to the 
rank of assistant manager and, in 1953, 
became operations manager for radio and 
tv. Extracurricularly, Kliewer is a mem- 
ber of the Newport News Planning Commission and also on the board 
of trustees and executive committee of the Peninsula United Fund. 

Cene Accas is the new v.p. for network 
relations of Grey Advertising Agency, N.Y. 
Accas, who joined Grey last year, is a vet- 
eran in the field of broadcasting. He served 
ABC as administrative v.p. and v.p. of sales, 
development. He was also with NBC, in 
radio sales development, and with TvB as 
v.p. of operations at the industry trade as- 
sociation. In announcing Accas' election to 

the post, chm. of the board Lawrence Valenstein said, "We are for- 
tunate in having someone who knows network operations intimately." 

Charles Woodard, Jr., was appointed v.p. 
and assistant to the president of the West- 
inghouse Broadcasting Co. Prior to join- 
ing WBC. Woodard served with CBS, first 
as senior general attorney and later as as- 
sistant general attorney. This year he was 
elected Mayor of Hastings-on-Hudson where 
he resides with his wife and four children. 
In his new post, Woodard will serve 
KDKA, KDKA-TV, Pittsburgh; KYW, KYW-TV, Cleveland; WIND, 
Chicago; KEX, Portland, Oregon; WO WO, Fort Wayne, Ind.; WBZ, 
WBZ-TV, Boston; WJZ-TV, Baltimore and KPIX, San Francisco. 

Charles Young has been named national 
sales manager of KTTV, Los Angeles, after 
an eigbt-year tenure with the station as ac- 
count executive. Young's promotion is part 
of a major expansion in KTTV's sales de- 
partment. Other appointments include Rob- 
ert Bennett to local sales manager, James 
Hoffman, assistant national sales manager 
and Al Pryor to local account executive. 

John Vrba, v.p. of sales, stated the move is being made to meet 
the record-breaking business the station is receiving this year. 

SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 






WJAR-TV- CHANNEL 10 • PROVIDENCE, R. I.- NBC ■ ABC • REPRESENTED BY EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. 

SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 




The seller's viewpoint 



With this provocative letter from Cecil Wooduard, general manager of 
radio station WEJL, Scranton, Pa., SPONSOR begins a neiv weekly 
feature, "The Seller's Viewpoint." Planned as a much-needed forum 
of communications in the air media field, "The Seller's Viewpoint'''' 
affords an opportunity for those who sell radio/ tv time and facilities 
to speak out frankly and openly to advertisers about significant indus- 
try problems. Mr. Woodward, in this crisj) statement, tells why many 
radio men feel sliort changed by present measurement methods. 




"Please measure us completely" 



38 - - - - 23 - - - - 36 — Every 
aspiring Miss America is judged on 
the basis of at least three measure- 
ments. Yet, all too often, radio is 
bought on the basis of a single meas- 
urement — audience size. 

Now, win. lose or draw, we sub- 
scribe to and believe in audience 
studies, so this is no diatribe against 
the use of survc) figures for audience. 
We simply claim that we are entitled 
to be judged by other important 
measurements as well. 

Sitting on the other side of the 
desk, the side of the advertiser or 
agency, there are a number of things 
we believe to be mighty important, 
perhaps even more important than 
the audience numbers. 

Here are just a few of those things 
available on countless radio stations 
in this country today. 

When merchandising is offered, 
you get exactly what )our competitor 
gets — neither more nor less. 

You are not multiple-spotted. 

You get a minimum of 30 minutes 
protection from competitors. 

You are not in the company of 
cheap per inquiry or mail order busi- 
ness. 

You benefit by outstanding pro- 
gram and station promotion. 

You buy from accurate coverage 
mails without puffed up claims. 

Your commercials are handled by 



announcers trained and "sold" on 
the value of commercials and their 
importance. There is no haphazard 
handling of commercials in the hurry 
to get back to extolling the wonders 
of Presley, et al. 

No one gets an under-the-counter 
buy to your disadvantage. 

Station management monitors your 
commercials to protect you against 
sloppy live deliver) or bad technical 
production of your recorded com- 
mercials. After all, an affidavit doesn't 
tell you about the start at wrong 
speed, the deprecating intro by the 
d.j.. nor the bored "live"' delivery. 

Guaranteeing a time slot is not 
considered enough ; you' are advised 
and consulted on all program adja- 
cency changes. If you bought next 
to a sports show, those stations believe 
you should know if a stock report 
program replaces the sports show. 

Those are just a few of the things 
we think are important to you and 
available to you on many stations 
which don't happen to be number one 
by the numbers. 

Sure, it is our job to get these facts 
to your buyers and to you, but by the 
same token, we believe we could both 
benefit if you could expand your re- 
search to include personal agency 
and advertiser visitation to markets 
and stations to learn at first hand the 
stature and the sales potential of the 



stations in that market. First-hand 
discussion with station managers 
would also give you facts you need 
to get maximum sales results. 

Back to the numbers, briefly; when 
we're on top we love them and when 
we're not. we still think they are ex- 
tremely important. 

But wc completely disagree with 
stations which try to tout you off the 
top audience station by claiming it 
appeals only to the kids. We also dis- 
agree with those who by the use of 
generalization manage to label sta- 
tions in manners which fail utterly to 
properlj classify them. 

A station which does not play rock- 
and-roll is not automatically a 
"square" station with only a rocking 
chair audience, nor is a station which 
does play rock-and-roll a "kid" sta- 
tion appealing only to teenagers. 

For one very important reason, we 
believe that agencies and advertisers 
should explore the nature of all sta- 
tions in a given market and use the 
results of such exploration in com- 
bination with the audience figures. 
The important reason is the matter of 
sales. Without them you and your 
client would not be in business. And, 
by the same yardstick, no radio sta- 
tion can long survive without deliver- 
ing sales results for you. 

So — like aspiring Miss Americas — 
please measure us completely. ^ 



38 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 




fm years of it - ktiefedf Maskt/ille trade arm 



As Nashville's original tall-tower station, serving 91 counties in 4 

states, in the heart of the rich Southland, WLAC-TV has established 
for the Nashville market the big-area concept. 

Established loyalty, from area viewers, over a period of five years 
to guarantee you maximum sales power when you buy WLAC-TV 
in Nashville! 

Since the first day on the air, August 5, 1954, WLAC-TV has 
proven that maximum performance comes from maximum tower, 
maximum power, PLUS the maximum in program service. 



Nielsen it 3 clearly shows the big audience bonus 
found only on WLAC-TV. Ask your Katz man. 




Always the leader . . . 

in the things that count! 



Robert M. Rewschle 
General Soles Manager 



T 6 Baker. Jr. 
E»ecutive Vice-Piendenf 
and General Manager 




National Representative. The Kati Agency, Inc. 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 



SPONSOR 



Fm takes a giant step 

Last week in Chicago, the newly formed FM Broadcasters 
Association held its first convention, adopted hy-laws and 
elected officers (see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6). 

sponsor's editors, attending the meeting, report more 
enthusiasm, determination, seriousness of purpose and prac- 
tical planning on the part of fm station men than die medium 
has ever known. 

There's no question that fm is on the march. Interest in 
fm programing, listening and advertising is building rapidly 
in all sections of the country, as sponsor reported in its issue 
of 13 June. 

Dr. Sydney Roslow of The Pulse told the convention, "FM 
no longer means the Frustrated Medium." He suggested that 
a more proper designation for modern fm operations would 
be "Finance Minded." 

We wholly agree with Syd and believe that fin, having 
taken a giant step toward industry solidarity, can look for- 
ward to a bright and profitable future. 

We welcome fin's emergence as a major factor in the air 
media picture. 



Radio conducts a polio clinic 

The kinds and varieties of important public service which 
radio performs locally never cease to amaze us. A letter 
from Pittsburgh this week tells of a drive by station KQV to 
get office workers in the Golden Triangle to have polio shots. 

Following a saturation air campaign KQV purchased large 
stocks of polio vaccine and, with the aid of local health, Red 
Cross, and other volunteers, opened a five day clinic at which 
10,000 Pittsburghers received Salk shots. 

It was the largest polio clinic ever held. The moral to the 
story: radio, on the local level, has become America's most 
influential community force. 




THIS WE FIGHT FOR: Greater awareness on 
the part of national advertisers of the signifi- 
cance of radio's local power. Radio's place in 
community life gives it added stature and 
heightened values as a selling medium. 



Taking KASK to task: Envelopes 
being mailed out by radio station 
KASK, Ontario, Cal., bear the post- 
age meter ad slogan: "The Total Sell- 
ing Medium is The Daily News- 
paper." 

Corporate image: In the same 49th 
and Madison building that houses 
sponsor is a tenant listed as HELLER 
HOPE, INC. We'll take Hope; the 
alternative ive've tried. 

Incendiary: Some years back, I 
worked for a small town radio sta- 
tion so understaffed that salesmen 
often read on the air in the evening 
the commercials they had sold during 
the day. One of these salesmen be- 
gan every announcement with, 
"Folks, here's a red-hot special . . ." 
which infuriated the manager. Each 
time he was told to cut it out, he 
blithely agreed to, but once on the 
air, reverted to his "red-hot" intro. 
One night, the station manager sat 
with him in the studio. As the sales- 
man said, "Red-hot special," the man- 
ager whipped out a cigarette lighter, 
set fire to the salesman's page of 
copy. The salesman read faster and 
faster, his eyes bugging in alarm, 
and barely finished the sheet before 
it turned to ashes. Never again did 
he announce a "red-hot special." — I. 
McMahill. 

Faster relief: According to Phil 
Stone, CHUM, Toronto, Khrushchev's 
recipe for a hangover is raw cabbage 
and cucumbers. Oh well, getting there 
is half the fun. 

Vicary-ous: From a news story in 
the Humboldt Times, Eureka, Cal., 
sent in by Eureka's KINS program 
and promotion manager Doyle Seely 
— "A love-starved widow needled 
John Crockett's wife over the phone 
with strains of Seven Years With the 
Wrong Woman and Oh, Johnny, How 
You Can Love. ... In addition, the 
37-year-old widow blew a whistle and 
horn at times during the wordless 
calls, the witness testified." Oh, 
Jim Vicary, what hath subliminal 
iv r ought! 

Opinion: TV Guide reports a singer, 
who tried to deduct the cost of gowns 
she had worn on tv shows, was told 
by Internal Revenue she could only 
deduct the cost of "any gown she 
can't sit down in." 



90 



SPONSOR • 26 SEPTEMBER 1959 



IS 

WHEELING'S 
NEW 
LEADER 



TRENDEX confirms what Wheeling Valley lis- 
teners know: WOMP Radio is the favorite station 
in the market! Have you switched to the station 
where the listeners are? Or, are you still buying 
the stations where they were? And paying a 
premium! Call Charley King direct, or JEPCO 
in your city, about the BIG ONE with 35% to 
40% of the audience all day! Your sales curve 
will really romp with WOMP on your schedule! 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY PEARSON 



NOW. . . more good music on WDOK! 




Radio — as WDOK plays it 



There's good news to tell you and so much more 
good music to share, too. 

By rearranging our schedule of commercial an- 
nouncements between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. daily, 
WDOK now presents even more good music pro- 
gramming. 

This means more good music for the adult listener 
in Northern Ohio, and better service for all clients. 



Yes, WDOK is broadcasting even more heavenly 
music. This is another indication of our earnest 
desire to bring the very best in radio entertainment 
to our listeners and to help clients get better results 
through good programs. 

Good programming goes hand in hand with good 
advertising on WDOK — Cleveland's better music 
station. 

WDOK and you — that's harmony! 



WDOK 

Represented nationally by Broadcast Times Sales, Inc. 



FREDERICK WOLF, GENERAL MANAGER 
THE CIVIC BROADCASTERS, INC. 
1515 EUCLID AVENUE, CLEVELAND, OHIO 



ISTORY 
OF THE 



KSAN 



POSITION IN THE RICH 
SAN FRANCISCO- OA KLAND 
NEGRO MARKET. . 




USE HISTORY FOR YOUR YARD STICK- NOT HEARSAY. 

u ||*F KSAN FOR mVFRAGF (IF THF RICH BAY ARFA NFfiRfl MARKET